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Employment Effects of Skill Biased Technological Change when Benefits are Linked to Per-Capita Income

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  • Matthias Weiss

    () (Munich Center for the Economics of Aging (MEA))

Abstract

This paper studies the employment effects of technological change when benefits are endogenous. If the (i) level of welfare aid depends on the general income level in the economy and (ii) wages for unskilled workers cannot fall below the level of welfare aid, there is a link between the wage for unskilled labor and the productivity of skilled labor. An increase in the latter will lead to an increase in average income and hence the level of welfare aid. This in turn leads unions to ask for higher wages for unskilled workers. Technological change is shown to have employment effects (only) if it is skill-biased and if this link exists.

Suggested Citation

  • Matthias Weiss, 2004. "Employment Effects of Skill Biased Technological Change when Benefits are Linked to Per-Capita Income," MEA discussion paper series 04043, Munich Center for the Economics of Aging (MEA) at the Max Planck Institute for Social Law and Social Policy.
  • Handle: RePEc:mea:meawpa:04043
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • J50 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor-Management Relations, Trade Unions, and Collective Bargaining - - - General
    • O30 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - General

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