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Agglomeration, Vertical Specialization, and the Strength of Industrial Linkages

  • Jan Kranich


    (Leuphana Universität Lüneburg)

This paper picks up the seminal model of Venables (1996) and provides a quantifying concept for the sectoral coherence in vertical-linkage models of the New Economic Geography. Based upon an alternative approach to solve the model and to determine critical trade cost values, this paper focuses on the interdependencies between agglomeration, specialization and the strength of vertical linkages. A central concern is the idea of an ’industrial base,’ which is attracting linked industries but is persistent to relocation. As a main finding, the intermediate cost share and substitution elasticity basically determine the strength of linkages. Thus, these parameters affect how strong the industrial base responds to changes in trade costs, relative wages and market size.

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Paper provided by University of Lüneburg, Institute of Economics in its series Working Paper Series in Economics with number 98.

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Length: 44 pages
Date of creation: Sep 2008
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:lue:wpaper:98
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  1. repec:tpr:qjecon:v:110:y:1995:i:4:p:857-80 is not listed on IDEAS
  2. Ottaviano, Gianmarco I. P., 2002. "Regional policy in the global economy : insights from new economic geography," HWWA Discussion Papers 211, Hamburg Institute of International Economics (HWWA).
  3. David L. Hummels & Dana Rapoport & Kei-Mu Yi, 1998. "Vertical specialization and the changing nature of world trade," Economic Policy Review, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, issue Jun, pages 79-99.
  4. Ethier, Wilfred J, 1982. "National and International Returns to Scale in the Modern Theory of International Trade," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 72(3), pages 389-405, June.
  5. Krugman, Paul & Venables, Anthony J., 1995. "Globalization and the Inequality of Nations," Working Paper Series 430, Research Institute of Industrial Economics.
  6. J. Peter Neary, 2000. "Of hype and hyperbolas : introducing the new economic geography," Working Papers 200019, School of Economics, University College Dublin.
  7. Hummels, David & Ishii, Jun & Yi, Kei-Mu, 2001. "The nature and growth of vertical specialization in world trade," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(1), pages 75-96, June.
  8. Markusen, James R, 1989. "Trade in Producer Services and in Other Specialized Intermediate Inputs," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 79(1), pages 85-95, March.
  9. K.H. Midelfart & H.G. Overman & S.J. Redding & A.J. Venables, 2000. "The location of European industry," European Economy - Economic Papers 142, Directorate General Economic and Financial Affairs (DG ECFIN), European Commission.
  10. Rivera-Batiz, Francisco L., 1988. "Increasing returns, monopolistic competition, and agglomeration economies in consumption and production," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 125-153, February.
  11. repec:oup:qjecon:v:110:y:1995:i:4:p:857-80 is not listed on IDEAS
  12. Paul Krugman, 1990. "Increasing Returns and Economic Geography," NBER Working Papers 3275, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  13. Venables, Anthony J, 1996. "Equilibrium Locations of Vertically Linked Industries," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 37(2), pages 341-59, May.
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