IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/lsg/lsgwps/wp60.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Adaptation to climate change and economic growth in developing countries

Author

Listed:
  • Antony Millner
  • Simon Dietz

Abstract

The global climate is changing, and will continue to do so even if greenhouse gas emissions are dramatically curbed. Economies are therefore faced with the challenge of adapting to climate change. This challenge is particularly important in developing countries, which, due to a combination of unfortunate geography and high sensitivity, are most vulnerable to climate change. From a macro-economic point of view, there remains much to learn about the characteristics of optimal adaptation. In particular, it is unclear whether the best way to adapt to climate change is simply to focus on traditional growth and development goals, or to divert significant investment into �climate-proofing� productive capital. In this paper we conduct analytical and numerical modeling to gain new insights into this question. Our analytical model shows that the task of apportioning investment between productive capital and adaptation to climate change is a subtle one. While it is very unlikely that the optimal strategy involves no investment in adaptation, the scale and composition of productive and adaptive capital investments depend on empirical context. Our numerical application to Sub-Saharan Africa suggests, however, that in most contingencies it will be optimal to invest rapidly in adaptive capital over the coming decades. Our sensitivity analysis goes well beyond the existing literature in evaluating the robustness of this finding.

Suggested Citation

  • Antony Millner & Simon Dietz, 2011. "Adaptation to climate change and economic growth in developing countries," GRI Working Papers 60, Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment.
  • Handle: RePEc:lsg:lsgwps:wp60
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.lse.ac.uk/GranthamInstitute/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/Adapt_finalEDE.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Kenneth L. Judd, 1998. "Numerical Methods in Economics," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262100711, January.
    2. Manoj Atolia & Edward F. Buffie, 2004. "Reverse Shooting Made Easy: Solving for the Global Nonlinear Saddle Path," Working Papers wp2009_01_01, Department of Economics, Florida State University, revised Jan 2009.
    3. Kelly, David L. & Kolstad, Charles D. & Mitchell, Glenn T., 2005. "Adjustment costs from environmental change," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 50(3), pages 468-495, November.
    4. Kelly, David L. & Kolstad, Charles D., 1999. "Bayesian learning, growth, and pollution," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 23(4), pages 491-518, February.
    5. Kelly, David L. & Kolstad, Charles D., 2001. "Malthus and Climate Change: Betting on a Stable Population," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 41(2), pages 135-161, March.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Paul Alagidede & George Adu & Prince Boakye Frimpong, 2016. "The effect of climate change on economic growth: evidence from Sub-Saharan Africa," Environmental Economics and Policy Studies, Springer;Society for Environmental Economics and Policy Studies - SEEPS, vol. 18(3), pages 417-436, July.
    2. Akinyemi, Opeyemi & Ogundipe, Adeyemi & Alege, Philip, 2012. "Energy Supply and Climate Change in Nigeria," MPRA Paper 55820, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. repec:spr:masfgc:v:23:y:2018:i:3:d:10.1007_s11027-017-9739-y is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:lsg:lsgwps:wp60. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (The GRI Administration). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/grlseuk.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.