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Ownership Concentration and Firm Performance in Slovenia

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  • Joze P. Damiajn
  • Aleksandra Grogoric
  • Janez Prasnikar

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  • Joze P. Damiajn & Aleksandra Grogoric & Janez Prasnikar, 2004. "Ownership Concentration and Firm Performance in Slovenia," LICOS Discussion Papers 14204, LICOS - Centre for Institutions and Economic Performance, KU Leuven.
  • Handle: RePEc:lic:licosd:14204
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    File URL: http://www.econ.kuleuven.be/licos/publications/dp/dp142.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Barclay, Michael J. & Holderness, Clifford G., 1989. "Private benefits from control of public corporations," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(2), pages 371-395, December.
    2. Marko Pahor & Janez Prasnikar & Anuska Ferligoj, 2004. "Building a corporate network in a transition economy: the case of Slovenia," Post-Communist Economies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(3), pages 307-331.
    3. Barclay, Michael J & Holderness, Clifford G, 1991. " Negotiated Block Trades and Corporate Control," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 46(3), pages 861-878, July.
    4. Shleifer, Andrei & Vishny, Robert W, 1986. "Large Shareholders and Corporate Control," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 94(3), pages 461-488, June.
    5. John S. Earle & Csaba Kucsera & Álmos Telegdy, 2005. "Ownership Concentration and Corporate Performance on the Budapest Stock Exchange: do too many cooks spoil the goulash?," Corporate Governance: An International Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 13(2), pages 254-264, March.
    6. Blundell, Richard & Bond, Stephen, 1998. "Initial conditions and moment restrictions in dynamic panel data models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 87(1), pages 115-143, August.
    7. Jeffrey Zwiebel, 1995. "Block Investment and Partial Benefits of Corporate Control," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 62(2), pages 161-185.
    8. Mike Burkart & Denis Gromb & Fausto Panunzi, 1997. "Large Shareholders, Monitoring, and the Value of the Firm," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 112(3), pages 693-728.
    9. Aleksandra Gregoric & Cristina Vespro, 2009. "Block trades and the benefits of control in Slovenia," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 17(1), pages 175-210, January.
    10. Koke, Jens & Renneboog, Luc, 2005. "Do Corporate Control and Product Market Competition Lead to Stronger Productivity Growth? Evidence from Market-Oriented and Blockholder-Based Governance Regimes," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 48(2), pages 475-516, October.
    11. Barclay, Michael J & Holderness, Clifford G, 1992. "The Law and Large-Block Trades," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 35(2), pages 265-294, October.
    12. Demsetz, Harold & Lehn, Kenneth, 1985. "The Structure of Corporate Ownership: Causes and Consequences," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 93(6), pages 1155-1177, December.
    13. Manuel Arellano & Stephen Bond, 1991. "Some Tests of Specification for Panel Data: Monte Carlo Evidence and an Application to Employment Equations," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 58(2), pages 277-297.
    14. Anup Agrawal & Charles R. Knoeber, "undated". "Firm Performance and Mechanisms to Control Agency Problems between Managers and Shareholders (Revision of 29-94)," Rodney L. White Center for Financial Research Working Papers 8-96, Wharton School Rodney L. White Center for Financial Research.
    15. Agrawal, Anup & Knoeber, Charles R., 1996. "Firm Performance and Mechanisms to Control Agency Problems between Managers and Shareholders," Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 31(03), pages 377-397, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Simoneti, Marko & Damijan, Joze P. & Rojec, Matija & Majcen, Boris, 2005. "Case-by-Case Versus mass privatization in transition economies: Initial owner and final seller effects on performance of firms in Slovenia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 33(10), pages 1603-1625, October.

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