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Does Job Satisfaction Adapt to Working Conditions? An Empirical Analysis for Rotating Shift Work, Flextime,and Temporary Employment in UK

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  • Dominik Hanglberger

    (LEUPHANA University Lüneburg,Department of Economic, Behaviour and Law Sciences, Research Institute on Professions (Forschungsinstitut Freie Berufe (FFB)))

Abstract

The hedonic treadmill model for subjective well-being was subject to several recent empirical analyses based on individual panel data. Most of this adaptation literature is concentrated on how life events affect measures of life satisfaction and happiness, whereas adaptation processes of domain satisfactions like job satisfaction are largely unstudied. The aim of this paper is to test empirically adaptation processes of self-reported job satisfaction. For this purpose we consider flexibility characteristics of a job and derive hypotheses about which flexibility measures allow for or impede adaptation processes. Hypotheses are tested using data from up to 18 waves of the British Household Panel Survey (BHPS). We estimate fixed-effects panel models to test adaptation processes based on intra-individual changes in job satisfaction. Our results show no adaptation to rotating shift work, little adaptation to temporary employment, but full adaptation to flextime regulations.

Suggested Citation

  • Dominik Hanglberger, 2011. "Does Job Satisfaction Adapt to Working Conditions? An Empirical Analysis for Rotating Shift Work, Flextime,and Temporary Employment in UK," FFB-Discussionpaper 87, Research Institute on Professions (Forschungsinstitut Freie Berufe (FFB)), LEUPHANA University Lüneburg.
  • Handle: RePEc:leu:wpaper:87
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Ada Ferrer-i-Carbonell & Paul Frijters, 2004. "How Important is Methodology for the estimates of the determinants of Happiness?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 114(497), pages 641-659, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Dominik Hanglberger & Joachim Merz, 2015. "Does self-employment really raise job satisfaction? Adaptation and anticipation effects on self-employment and general job changes," Working Papers 385, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
    2. Dominik Hanglberger & Joachim Merz, 2015. "Does self-employment really raise job satisfaction? Adaptation and anticipation effects on self-employment and general job changes [Erhöht eine Selbständigkeit wirklich die Arbeitszufriedenheit? Ad," Journal for Labour Market Research, Springer;Institute for Employment Research/ Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), vol. 48(4), pages 287-303, December.
    3. Suppa, Nicolai, 2012. "Job Characteristics and Subjective Well-Being in Australia – A Capability Approach Perspective," Ruhr Economic Papers 388, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
    4. Nicolai Suppa, 2012. "Job Characteristics and Subjective Well-Being in Australia – A Capability Approach Perspective," Ruhr Economic Papers 0388, Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universität Dortmund, Universität Duisburg-Essen.
    5. Ekaterina Uglanova & Jan Dettmers, 2018. "Sustained Effects of Flexible Working Time Arrangements on Subjective Well-Being," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 19(6), pages 1727-1748, August.
    6. repec:zbw:rwirep:0388 is not listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    job satisfaction; adaptation; hedonic treadmill model; rotating shift work; temporary employment; flextime; British Household Panel Study; fixed-effects panel estimation;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J28 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Safety; Job Satisfaction; Related Public Policy
    • J81 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Standards - - - Working Conditions

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