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Are Foreign Firms More Technologically Intensive? UK Establishment Evidence From the ARD

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  • Nigel Driffield
  • Karl Taylor

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Abstract

This paper employs establishment level data from the annual respondents database to consider technological differences between establishments operating in the UK. We adopt very precise measures of technology, arguably much more detailed than have hitherto been employed to address the key question of whether use of technology differs by nationality. After numerous controls we find that typically North American establishments have a higher probability of being more technologically intensive than their UK counterparts. This result also stands up in panel analysis.
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  • Nigel Driffield & Karl Taylor, "undated". "Are Foreign Firms More Technologically Intensive? UK Establishment Evidence From the ARD," Discussion Papers in Public Sector Economics 01/9, Division of Economics, School of Business, University of Leicester.
  • Handle: RePEc:lec:lpserc:01/9
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Taylor, Karl & Driffield, Nigel, 2005. "Wage inequality and the role of multinationals: evidence from UK panel data," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 12(2), pages 223-249, April.

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