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Analysing the links between child health and education outcomes: Evidence from NIDS Waves 1 – 4

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  • Daniela Casale

    (Economics, University of the Witwatersrand)

Abstract

This paper explores the relationship between child nutrition and schooling outcomes using data from the National Income Dynamics Survey (NIDS) panel data. The recent release of the NIDS panel data from 2008-2015 presents the first opportunity to examine the implications of early child health on human capital accumulation at the national level. This work estimates the relationship between poor nutrition, measured by stunting and obesity in early childhood, and later schooling outcomes among children aged 7 to 14 years. The results suggest that young children who were stunted in Wave 1 go on to complete fewer years of schooling than the children who did not suffer from early undernutrition, not only because they enter school at a later age, but because they progress more slowly through the schooling system. In contrast, no discernible relationship is identified between obesity status and schooling outcomes in young children.

Suggested Citation

  • Daniela Casale, 2016. "Analysing the links between child health and education outcomes: Evidence from NIDS Waves 1 – 4," SALDRU Working Papers 179, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.
  • Handle: RePEc:ldr:wpaper:179
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    File URL: http://opensaldru.uct.ac.za/bitstream/handle/11090/837/2016_179_Saldruwp.pdf?sequence=1
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Harold Alderman & John Hoddinott & Bill Kinsey, 2006. "Long term consequences of early childhood malnutrition," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 58(3), pages 450-474, July.
    2. Harold Alderman & Hans Hoogeveen & Mariacristina Rossi, 2009. "Preschool Nutrition and Subsequent Schooling Attainment: Longitudinal Evidence from Tanzania," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 57(2), pages 239-260, January.
    3. Harold Alderman & Jere R. Behrman & Victor Lavy & Rekha Menon, 2001. "Child Health and School Enrollment: A Longitudinal Analysis," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 36(1), pages 185-205.
    4. Nicola Branson & David Lam & Linda Zuze, 2012. "Education: Analysis of the NIDS Wave 1 and 2 Datasets," SALDRU Working Papers 81, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.
    5. Glewwe, Paul & Jacoby, Hanan G. & King, Elizabeth M., 2001. "Early childhood nutrition and academic achievement: a longitudinal analysis," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 81(3), pages 345-368, September.
    6. Ian M. Timæus & Sandile Simelane & Thabo Letsoalo, 2013. "Poverty, Race, and Children's Progress at School in South Africa," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(2), pages 270-284, February.
    7. Cally Ardington & Boingotlo Gasealahwe, 2012. "Health: Analysis of the NIDS Wave 1 and 2 Datasets," SALDRU Working Papers 80, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.
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