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The Effects of Social Security Taxes and Minimum Wages on Employment: Evidence from Turkey

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  • Kerry Papps

    () (Nuffield College)

Abstract

sing worker-level panel data for Turkey, this paper analyses the separate employment effects of increases in the social security taxes paid by employers and increases in the minimum wage between 2002 and 2005. Variation over time and among low-wage workers in the ratio of total labour costs to the gross wage gives rise to a natural experiment. Regression estimates indicate that a given increase in social security taxes has a larger negative effect on the probability of a worker remaining employed in the next quarter than an equal-sized increase in the minimum wage. Those who retain their jobs in the next quarter also experience a larger reduction in working hours when social security taxes increase than when the minimum wage rises. This is consistent with a situation in which workers increase effort in response to an increase in wages. Men, rural-dwellers and those under 30 are found to have the strongest overall disemployment effects in response to increases in labour costs.

Suggested Citation

  • Kerry Papps, 2010. "The Effects of Social Security Taxes and Minimum Wages on Employment: Evidence from Turkey," Koç University-TUSIAD Economic Research Forum Working Papers 1017, Koc University-TUSIAD Economic Research Forum.
  • Handle: RePEc:koc:wpaper:1017
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    File URL: http://eaf.ku.edu.tr/sites/eaf.ku.edu.tr/files/erf_wp_1017.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. World Bank, 2008. "Investing in Turkey's Next Generation : The School-to-Work Transition and Turkey's Development," World Bank Other Operational Studies 8084, The World Bank.
    2. Sibel Cengiz & Afsin Sahin, 2014. "Modelling nonlinear behavior of labor force participation rate by STAR: An application for Turkey," International Journal of Business and Economic Sciences Applied Research (IJBESAR), Eastern Macedonia and Thrace Institute of Technology (EMATTECH), Kavala, Greece, vol. 7(1), pages 113-127, April.
    3. Betcherman, Gordon & Daysal, N. Meltem & Pagés, Carmen, 2010. "Do employment subsidies work? Evidence from regionally targeted subsidies in Turkey," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(4), pages 710-722, August.
    4. World Bank, 2008. "Turkey - Country Economic Memorandum : Volume 2. Sustaining High Growth, Selected Issues," World Bank Other Operational Studies 8017, The World Bank.
    5. H. Lehmann & A. Muravyev, 2012. "Labor Market Institutions and Informality in Transition and Latin American Countries," Working Papers wp854, Dipartimento Scienze Economiche, Universita' di Bologna.
    6. Alfredo M. Pereira & Jorge M. Andraz, 2014. "On the Long-Term Macroeconomic Effects of Social Security Spending: Evidence for 12 EU Countries," CEFAGE-UE Working Papers 2014_08, University of Evora, CEFAGE-UE (Portugal).

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    JEL classification:

    • J32 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Nonwage Labor Costs and Benefits; Retirement Plans; Private Pensions

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