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Susceptibility to Default Training Options Across the Population

Author

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  • Borghans, Lex

    () (Maastricht University)

  • Golsteyn, Bart H.H.

    () (Maastricht University)

Abstract

This paper analyzes the tendency of people to choose default options when offered courses to acquire job related skills. We ask a random sample of Dutch people aged 6-80 which three skills are most important in their (future or past) jobs. Further on in the survey, we randomly select one of the skills the respondent indicated and (hypothetically) offer the respondent a course regarding this skill. The respondent can accept this offer, but can also exchange it for a course regarding one of the two other skills indicated. Our findings indicate that people generally have a strong tendency to choose the default option. This effect is similar across gender and education level. It appears that the effect of the default option is less strong around age 30 and declines after age 60.

Suggested Citation

  • Borghans, Lex & Golsteyn, Bart H.H., 2015. "Susceptibility to Default Training Options Across the Population," IZA Discussion Papers 9180, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp9180
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Abadie, Alberto & Gay, Sebastien, 2006. "The impact of presumed consent legislation on cadaveric organ donation: A cross-country study," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(4), pages 599-620, July.
    2. Altmann, Steffen & Falk, Armin & Grunewald, Andreas, 2013. "Incentives and Information as Driving Forces of Default Effects," IZA Discussion Papers 7610, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    3. Lex Borghans & Bart Golsteyn, 2014. "Default options and training participation," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 46(4), pages 1417-1428, June.
    4. Gabriel D. Carroll & James J. Choi & David Laibson & Brigitte C. Madrian & Andrew Metrick, 2009. "Optimal Defaults and Active Decisions," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 124(4), pages 1639-1674.
    5. Johnson, Eric J & Hershey, John & Meszaros, Jacqueline & Kunreuther, Howard, 1993. "Framing, Probability Distortions, and Insurance Decisions," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 7(1), pages 35-51, August.
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    1. repec:eee:joepsy:v:65:y:2018:i:c:p:41-59 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    experiment; default option; human capital; training;

    JEL classification:

    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • I2 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education

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