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Traits, Imitation, and Evolutionary Dynamics

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  • Schnedler, Wendelin

    () (University of Paderborn)

Abstract

In this article, a modelling framework for the information transmission between agents in an evolutionary game setting is proposed. Agents observe traits which reflect past and present behaviour and success of other agents. If agents imitate more successful agents based on these traits, the resulting dynamics are a multivariate stochastic process. An example for such a process is simulated. The results resemble the replicator dynamics to a remarkable degree. If traits moderately depend on the past, this accelerates convergence of the dynamics towards a stable state. If the dependence is strong, the stable state is not reached.

Suggested Citation

  • Schnedler, Wendelin, 2003. "Traits, Imitation, and Evolutionary Dynamics," IZA Discussion Papers 849, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp849
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Robson, A.J., 1989. "Efficiency In Evolutionary Games: Darwin, Nash And Secret Handshake," Papers 89-22, Michigan - Center for Research on Economic & Social Theory.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    evolution of cooperation; simulation; imitation; replicator dynamics; information transmission;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C73 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Stochastic and Dynamic Games; Evolutionary Games
    • D83 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Search; Learning; Information and Knowledge; Communication; Belief; Unawareness

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