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Land Reforms, Status and Population Growth

Author

Listed:
  • Lehmijoki, Ulla

    () (University of Helsinki)

  • Palokangas, Tapio K.

    () (University of Helsinki)

Abstract

In this document, we consider the effects of a land reform on economic and demographic growth by a family-optimization model with sharecropping, endogenous fertility and status seeking. We show that tenant farming is the major obstacle to escaping the Malthusian trap with high fertility and low productivity. A land reform provides peasant families higher returns for their investments in land, encouraging them to increase their productivity of land rather than their family size. This decreases fertility and increases productivity in agriculture in the short and long runs. The European demographic history provides supporting evidence for this.

Suggested Citation

  • Lehmijoki, Ulla & Palokangas, Tapio K., 2014. "Land Reforms, Status and Population Growth," IZA Discussion Papers 8054, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp8054
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    Cited by:

    1. Fabio Sánchez Torres & Marta Juanita Villaveces Niño, 2016. "Tendencias y factores socioeconómicos y espaciales asociados a la adjudicación de baldíos en Colombia, 1961-2010," DOCUMENTOS CEDE 014577, UNIVERSIDAD DE LOS ANDES-CEDE.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    land reforms; population growth; status seeking; sharecropping;

    JEL classification:

    • O41 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - One, Two, and Multisector Growth Models
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • N33 - Economic History - - Labor and Consumers, Demography, Education, Health, Welfare, Income, Wealth, Religion, and Philanthropy - - - Europe: Pre-1913

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