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Wage Inequality, Linkages and FDI

Author

Listed:
  • Driffield, Nigel

    () (Aston University)

  • Girma, Sourafel

    () (University of Nottingham)

  • Henry, Michael

    () (Aston University)

  • Taylor, Karl

    () (University of Sheffield)

Abstract

This paper extends the existing literature on FDI and wage inequality. We do this in two ways. Firstly, we incorporate more precise measures of inward investment into the model, by allowing for differences in the effects between horizontal and vertical FDI. Secondly, after establishing the effects that inward investment has on wage inequality, we then analyse the reasons for this in terms of the wages paid to skilled and unskilled workers, and the effect that inward investment has on this. We illustrate the important differences that horizontal and vertical FDI have on both wages and wage inequality, and the importance of allowing for regional differences in the results. FDI nationally tends to increase wage inequality, while the local, effects are opposite. FDI into assisted areas tends to increase wage inequality nationally, when the MNEs purchase inputs in the local region.

Suggested Citation

  • Driffield, Nigel & Girma, Sourafel & Henry, Michael & Taylor, Karl, 2010. "Wage Inequality, Linkages and FDI," IZA Discussion Papers 4722, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp4722
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Daron Acemoglu, 1999. "Changes in Unemployment and Wage Inequality: An Alternative Theory and Some Evidence," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(5), pages 1259-1278, December.
    2. Bernard, Andrew B. & Jensen, J. Bradford, 1997. "Exporters, skill upgrading, and the wage gap," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(1-2), pages 3-31, February.
    3. Nigel Driffield & James H. Love & Karl Taylor, 2009. "Productivity And Labour Demand Effects Of Inward And Outward Foreign Direct Investment On Uk Industry," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 77(2), pages 171-203, March.
    4. repec:dau:papers:123456789/10093 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Bresnahan, Timothy F, 1999. "Computerisation and Wage Dispersion: An Analytical Reinterpretation," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 109(456), pages 390-415, June.
    6. Nigel Driffield & Sourafel Girma, 2003. "Regional Foreign Direct Investment and Wage Spillovers: Plant Level Evidence from the UK Electronics Industry," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 65(4), pages 453-474, September.
    7. Daron Acemoglu, 2002. "Technical Change, Inequality, and the Labor Market," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 40(1), pages 7-72, March.
    8. Nigel Driffield & Max Munday & Annette Roberts, 2004. "Inward investment, transaction linkages and productivity spillovers," Economics of Governance, Springer, vol. 83(4), pages 699-722, October.
    9. Eve Caroli & John Van Reenen, 2001. "Skill-Biased Organizational Change? Evidence from A Panel of British and French Establishments," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 116(4), pages 1449-1492.
    10. David G. Blanchflower & Andrew J. Oswald & Peter Sanfey, 1996. "Wages, Profits, and Rent-Sharing," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 111(1), pages 227-251.
    11. Manuel Arellano & Stephen Bond, 1991. "Some Tests of Specification for Panel Data: Monte Carlo Evidence and an Application to Employment Equations," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 58(2), pages 277-297.
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    Cited by:

    1. Merita Zulfiu Alili, 2014. "Simulation Analysis of the Effects of Increased Foreign Ownership on Wage Inequality," Academicus International Scientific Journal, Entrepreneurship Training Center Albania, issue 9, pages 140-158, January.
    2. Rafal Kierzenkowski & Isabell Koske, 2012. "Less Income Inequality and More Growth – Are they Compatible? Part 8. The Drivers of Labour Income Inequality – A Literature Review," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 931, OECD Publishing.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    wage inequality; FDI spillovers; backwards and forwards linkages;

    JEL classification:

    • F21 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Investment; Long-Term Capital Movements
    • F23 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Multinational Firms; International Business
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials

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