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How Changes in Unemployment Benefit Duration Affect the Inflow into Unemployment


  • van Ours, Jan C.

    () (Erasmus University Rotterdam)

  • Tuit, Sander

    () (Tilburg University)


We study how changes in the maximum benefit duration affect the inflow into unemployment in the Netherlands. Until August 2003, workers who became unemployed after age 57.5 were entitled to unemployment benefits until the age of 65, after which they would receive old age pensions. This characteristic made it attractive for workers to enter unemployment shortly after age 57.5 rather than shortly before. Indeed, we find a peak in the inflow into unemployment for workers after age 57.5. From August 2003 onwards the maximum benefit durations were reduced. We find that shortly after 2003 the peak in the inflow disappeared.

Suggested Citation

  • van Ours, Jan C. & Tuit, Sander, 2010. "How Changes in Unemployment Benefit Duration Affect the Inflow into Unemployment," IZA Discussion Papers 4691, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp4691

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Christofides, Louis N & McKenna, C J, 1996. "Unemployment Insurance and Job Duration in Canada," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 14(2), pages 286-312, April.
    2. Lalive, R. & van Ours, J.C. & Zweim├╝ller, J., 2006. "How Changes in Potential Benefit Duration Affect Equilibrium Unemployment," Discussion Paper 2006-94, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
    3. David A. Green & Timothy Sargent, 1998. "Unemployment Insurance and Job Durations: Seasonal and Non-Seasonal Jobs," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 31(2), pages 247-278, May.
    4. Winter-Ebmer, Rudolf, 2003. "Benefit duration and unemployment entry: A quasi-experiment in Austria," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 47(2), pages 259-273, April.
    5. Green, David A & Riddell, W Craig, 1997. "Qualifying for Unemployment Insurance: An Empirical Analysis," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 107(440), pages 67-84, January.
    6. Patricia M. Anderson & Bruce D. Meyer, 1997. "Unemployment Insurance Takeup Rates and the After-Tax Value of Benefits," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 112(3), pages 913-937.
    7. Christofides, Louis N. & McKenna, C. J., 1995. "Unemployment insurance and moral hazard in employment," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 49(2), pages 205-210, August.
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    Cited by:

    1. Hullegie, P.G.J., 2012. "Essays on health and labor economics," Other publications TiSEM dcc68fc9-7af1-4ba9-8f90-6, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
    2. Tuit, Sander & van Ours, Jan C., 2010. "How changes in unemployment benefit duration affect the inflow into unemployment," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 109(2), pages 105-107, November.
    3. Lammers, Marloes & Bloemen, Hans & Hochguertel, Stefan, 2013. "Job search requirements for older unemployed: Transitions to employment, early retirement and disability benefits," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 58(C), pages 31-57.
    4. Baguelin, Olivier & Remillon, Delphine, 2014. "Unemployment insurance and management of the older workforce in a dual labor market: Evidence from France," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 245-264.
    5. Patrick Hullegie & Jan Ours, 2014. "Seek and Ye Shall Find: How Search Requirements Affect Job Finding Rates of Older Workers," De Economist, Springer, vol. 162(4), pages 377-395, December.

    More about this item


    unemployment inflow; potential benefit duration; unemployment insurance;

    JEL classification:

    • H55 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Social Security and Public Pensions
    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search
    • J65 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment Insurance; Severance Pay; Plant Closings

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