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Migration to Sweden from the New EU Member States

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  • Wadensjö, Eskil

    (Stockholm University)

Abstract

Sweden did not apply any transitional rules for migrants coming from the ten new European Union member states in May 2004. The migration to Sweden from these countries also increased, especially from Poland and the Baltic states, even if not to the same extent as the immigration to Ireland and the UK (two countries with transitory rules of minor importance). The composition of the migrants changed. While earlier many more women than men arrived, now the gender composition is much more even. In this paper the labour market situation is studied for people living in Sweden at the end of 2005 who were either born in one of new member states or born in Sweden. The immigrants are represented in all sectors of the economy but overrepresented in some sectors. Their wages controlling for education are somewhat lower than those for natives. The labour market situation is rather good for the new immigrants and they are not overrepresented in different income transfer programs. The knowledge of these conditions may explain that Sweden abstained from introducing transitional rules also when Bulgaria and Romania became members of the European Union in January 2007.

Suggested Citation

  • Wadensjö, Eskil, 2007. "Migration to Sweden from the New EU Member States," IZA Discussion Papers 3190, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp3190
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Torun Österberg & Björn Gustafsson, 2001. "Immigrants and the public sector budget - accounting exercises for Sweden," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 14(4), pages 689-708.
    2. Boeri, Tito & Hanson, Gordon H. & McCormick, Barry (ed.), 2002. "Immigration Policy and the Welfare System: A Report for the Fondazione Rodolfo Debenedetti," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199256310.
    3. Borjas, George J, 1999. "Immigration and Welfare Magnets," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 17(4), pages 607-637, October.
    4. Willi Leibfritz & Paul O'Brien & Jean-Christophe Dumont, 2003. "Effects of Immigration on Labour Markets and Government Budgets - An Overview," CESifo Working Paper Series 874, CESifo.
    5. Jan Ekberg, 1999. "Immigration and the public sector: Income effects for the native population in Sweden," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 12(3), pages 411-430.
    6. Xavier Chojnicki, 2004. "The economie impact of immigration for the host countries," Brussels Economic Review, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles, vol. 47(1), pages 9-28.
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    Cited by:

    1. Elsner, Benjamin, 2013. "Emigration and wages: The EU enlargement experiment," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(1), pages 154-163.
    2. Martti Randveer & Tairi Room, 2009. "The structure of migration in Estonia: survey-based evidence," Bank of Estonia Working Papers 2009-01, Bank of Estonia, revised 14 Jul 2009.
    3. Månsson, Jonas & Olsson, Mikael, 2010. "Mobility sans integration? An analysis of labor market attainment in Sweden among its post-war immigrants from Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania and Poland," CAFO Working Papers 2010:6, Linnaeus University, Centre for Labour Market Policy Research (CAFO), School of Business and Economics.
    4. Anzelika Zaiceva & Klaus F. Zimmermann, 2008. "Scale, diversity, and determinants of labour migration in Europe," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 24(3), pages 428-452, Autumn.
    5. Michael Landesmann & Robert Stehrer & Hermine Vidovic, 2009. "Monthly Report No. 3/2009," wiiw Monthly Reports 2009-03, The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies, wiiw.
    6. Benjamin Elsner, 2013. "Does emigration benefit the stayers? Evidence from EU enlargement," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 26(2), pages 531-553, April.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    international migration; migration policy; common labour market;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration

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