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Migration to Sweden from the New EU Member States

  • Wadensjö, Eskil

    ()

    (Stockholm University)

Sweden did not apply any transitional rules for migrants coming from the ten new European Union member states in May 2004. The migration to Sweden from these countries also increased, especially from Poland and the Baltic states, even if not to the same extent as the immigration to Ireland and the UK (two countries with transitory rules of minor importance). The composition of the migrants changed. While earlier many more women than men arrived, now the gender composition is much more even. In this paper the labour market situation is studied for people living in Sweden at the end of 2005 who were either born in one of new member states or born in Sweden. The immigrants are represented in all sectors of the economy but overrepresented in some sectors. Their wages controlling for education are somewhat lower than those for natives. The labour market situation is rather good for the new immigrants and they are not overrepresented in different income transfer programs. The knowledge of these conditions may explain that Sweden abstained from introducing transitional rules also when Bulgaria and Romania became members of the European Union in January 2007.

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Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 3190.

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Length: 23 pages
Date of creation: Nov 2007
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp3190
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References listed on IDEAS
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  1. Willi Leibfritz & Paul O'Brien & Jean-Christophe Dumont, 2003. "Effects of Immigration on Labour Markets and Government Budgets - An Overview," CESifo Working Paper Series 874, CESifo Group Munich.
  2. Xavier Chojnicki, 2004. "The economie impact of immigration for the host countries," Brussels Economic Review, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles, vol. 47(1), pages 9-28.
  3. Boeri, Tito & Hanson, Gordon H. & McCormick, Barry (ed.), 2002. "Immigration Policy and the Welfare System: A Report for the Fondazione Rodolfo Debenedetti," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199256310, March.
  4. George J. Borjas, 1998. "Immigration and Welfare Magnets," NBER Working Papers 6813, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Torun Österberg & Björn Gustafsson, 2001. "Immigrants and the public sector budget - accounting exercises for Sweden," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 14(4), pages 689-708.
  6. Jan Ekberg, 1999. "Immigration and the public sector: Income effects for the native population in Sweden," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 12(3), pages 411-430.
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