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Russian Cities in Transition: The Impact of Market Forces in the 1990s

Author

Listed:
  • Gang, Ira N.

    () (Rutgers University)

  • Stuart, Robert C.

    () (Rutgers University)

Abstract

This paper analyses Russian city growth during the command and transition eras. Our main focus is on understanding the extent to which market forces are replacing command forces, and the resulting changes in Russian city growth patterns. We examine net migration rates for a sample of 171 medium and large cities for the period 1960 through 2002. We conclude that while the declining net migration rate was reversed during the first half of the 1990s, restrictions continued to matter during the early years of transition in the sense that net migration rates were lower in the restricted than in the unrestricted cities. This pattern seemingly came to an end in the late 1990s.

Suggested Citation

  • Gang, Ira N. & Stuart, Robert C., 2004. "Russian Cities in Transition: The Impact of Market Forces in the 1990s," IZA Discussion Papers 1151, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp1151
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Clayton, Elizabeth & Richardson, Thomas, 1989. "Soviet Control of City Size," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 38(1), pages 155-165, October.
    2. Andrienko, Yuri & Guriev, Sergei, 2003. "Determinants of Interregional Mobility in Russia: Evidence from Panel Data," CEPR Discussion Papers 3835, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    3. Gang, Ira N & Stuart, Robert C, 2002. "The Political Economy of Russian City Growth," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 50(3), pages 491-508, April.
    4. Ira N. Gang & Robert C. Stuart, 1999. "Mobility where mobility is illegal: Internal migration and city growth in the Soviet Union," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 12(1), pages 117-134.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    cities; city growth; migration; Russia; urbanization;

    JEL classification:

    • J6 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers
    • P20 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Systems and Transition Economies - - - General
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population

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