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Showing off to the new neighbors? Income, socioeconomic status and consumption patterns of internal migrants

  • Danzer, Alexander M.
  • Dietz, Barbara
  • Gatskova, Ksenia
  • Schmillen, Achim

This paper analyses incomes and socioeconomic status of internal migrants over time and in comparison to their new neighbors and investigates whether status consumption is a way for newly arrived city dwellers to signal their social standing. Using a novel dataset from the emerging economy of Kazakhstan we find that internal migrants earn an income and status premium for their move. In a comparison to indigenous city dwellers their earnings and household incomes are not significantly different; however, mobile households report a significantly higher subjective socio-economic status. Exploiting expenditure data, we find that recent migrant households gain status from using visible consumption to impress their new neighbors. This signaling might be used as adaptation to the new economic and social environment or to gain access to social capital.

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Paper provided by University of Munich, Department of Economics in its series Munich Reprints in Economics with number 20029.

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Date of creation: 2013
Date of revision:
Publication status: Published in Journal of Comparative Economics 1 42(2013): pp. 230-245
Handle: RePEc:lmu:muenar:20029
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