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Match or Mismatch? Automatic Admissions and College Preferences of Low- and High-Income Students

Author

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  • Lincove, Jane Arnold

    () (University of Maryland, Baltimore County)

  • Cortes, Kalena E.

    () (Texas A&M University)

Abstract

We examine the role of information in the college matching behavior of low- and high-income students, exploiting a state automatic admissions policy that provides some students with perfect a priori certainty of college admissions. We find that admissions certainty encourages college-ready low-income students to seek more rigorous universities. Low-income students who are less college-ready are not influenced by admissions certainty and are sensitive to college entrance exams scores. Most students also prefer campuses with students of similar race, income, and high school class rank, but only highly-qualified low-income students choose institutions where they have fewer same-race and same-income peers.

Suggested Citation

  • Lincove, Jane Arnold & Cortes, Kalena E., 2016. "Match or Mismatch? Automatic Admissions and College Preferences of Low- and High-Income Students," IZA Discussion Papers 10150, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp10150
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Dillon, Eleanor & Smith, Jeffrey A., 2015. "The Consequences of Academic Match between Students and Colleges," IZA Discussion Papers 9080, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Terry Long, B.Bridget, 2004. "How have college decisions changed over time? An application of the conditional logistic choice model," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 121(1-2), pages 271-296.
    3. Black, Dan A. & Smith, J.A.Jeffrey A., 2004. "How robust is the evidence on the effects of college quality? Evidence from matching," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 121(1-2), pages 99-124.
    4. Kalena E. Cortes & Jane Arnold Lincove, 2016. "Can Admissions Percent Plans Lead to Better Collegiate Fit for Minority Students?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 106(5), pages 348-354, May.
    5. Cortes, Kalena E., 2010. "Do Bans on Affirmative Action Hurt Minority Students? Evidence from the Texas Top 10% Plan," IZA Discussion Papers 5021, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    6. Caroline Hoxby & Christopher Avery, 2013. "The Missing "One-Offs": The Hidden Supply of High-Achieving, Low-Income Students," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 44(1 (Spring), pages 1-65.
    7. Griffith, Amanda L. & Rothstein, Donna S., 2009. "Can't get there from here: The decision to apply to a selective college," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 28(5), pages 620-628, October.
    8. Cortes, Kalena E., 2010. "Do bans on affirmative action hurt minority students? Evidence from the Texas Top 10% Plan," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(6), pages 1110-1124, December.
    9. Kalena E. Cortes, 2010. "Do Bans on Affirmative Action Hurt Minority Students? Evidence from the Texas Top 10% Plan," Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles 10-168, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
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    Cited by:

    1. Dillon, Eleanor & Smith, Jeffrey A., 2015. "The Consequences of Academic Match between Students and Colleges," IZA Discussion Papers 9080, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Eleanor Wiske Dillon & Jeffrey Smith, 2018. "The Consequences of Academic Match between Students and Colleges," Working Papers 2018-060, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
    3. Lois Miller & Humberto Barreto, 2017. "The Role Of Distance In College Undermatching," Working Papers 2017-01, DePauw University, Department of Economics and Management.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    admissions policies; social matching; academic undermatching and overmatching; Texas Top 10% Plan; automatic admissions;

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • I23 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Higher Education; Research Institutions
    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination

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