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Immigration in the U.S. Midwest During the 1990s: A Decade of Rapid Change


  • Huffman, Wallace


This paper examines immigration trends and economic impacts of immigration on the Midwest over the 1990s, especially for rural and agricultural labor markets and places them in context relative to changes in California, Florida, and Texas and the whole United States. The 1990s was a period of rapid change, and it seem likely that new immigrants will not be assimilated quickly because a majority of them have low education, do not speak English well, or know the local culture. The paper concludes that the U.S. should consider a new immigration policy that gives greater weight to skill and financial capital.

Suggested Citation

  • Huffman, Wallace, 2003. "Immigration in the U.S. Midwest During the 1990s: A Decade of Rapid Change," Staff General Research Papers Archive 11172, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:isu:genres:11172

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. George J. Borjas, 2000. "The Economic Progress of Immigrants," NBER Chapters,in: Issues in the Economics of Immigration, pages 15-50 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Carneiro, Pedro & Heckman, James J., 2003. "Human Capital Policy," IZA Discussion Papers 821, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. George J. Borjas, 1994. "The Economics of Immigration," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 32(4), pages 1667-1717, December.
    4. Gordon H. Hanson, 2003. "What Has Happened to Wages in Mexico since NAFTA?," NBER Working Papers 9563, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Juhn, Chinhui & Murphy, Kevin M & Pierce, Brooks, 1993. "Wage Inequality and the Rise in Returns to Skill," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 101(3), pages 410-442, June.
    6. Finis Welch, 1999. "In Defense of Inequality," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, pages 1-17.
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