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China's Socialist Market Economy: Lessons of Success

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  • Arvind Virmani

    (Indian Council for Research on International Economic Relations)

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  • Arvind Virmani, 2005. "China's Socialist Market Economy: Lessons of Success," Indian Council for Research on International Economic Relations, New Delhi Working Papers 178, Indian Council for Research on International Economic Relations, New Delhi, India.
  • Handle: RePEc:ind:icrier:178
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Eswar Prasad & Shang-Jin Wei, 2007. "The Chinese Approach to Capital Inflows: Patterns and Possible Explanations," NBER Chapters, in: Capital Controls and Capital Flows in Emerging Economies: Policies, Practices, and Consequences, pages 421-480, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Lardy,Nicholas R., 1992. "Foreign Trade and Economic Reform in China," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521414951, July.
    3. A. P. Lerner, 1934. "Economic Theory and Socialist Economy," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 2(1), pages 51-61.
    4. David E. Bloom & David Canning & Jaypee Sevilla, 2001. "Economic Growth and the Demographic Transition," NBER Working Papers 8685, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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