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Family Size and Birth Order in Chile: Using Twins as a Natural Experiment

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Abstract

This study estimates the causal effect of family size and birth order on educational attainment of individuals in the long run. Following recent literature we use the presence of twins as an instrumental variable for family size and fixed effects model for birth order. The results suggest that in Chile there is a negative relationship between family size and individuals’ educational achievements. Moreover, it shows a strong significant and positive effect of being a big brother. However, in larger families there is a nonlinear effect in which middle siblings are less favored.

Suggested Citation

  • Claudia Sanhueza, 2009. "Family Size and Birth Order in Chile: Using Twins as a Natural Experiment," ILADES-UAH Working Papers inv234, Universidad Alberto Hurtado/School of Economics and Business.
  • Handle: RePEc:ila:ilades:inv234
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    birth order; family size; family fixed effects; twins; natural experiments.;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J12 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Marriage; Marital Dissolution; Family Structure
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth

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