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Semiparametric reduced form estimation of tuition subsidies


  • Hidehiko Ichimura

    () (Institute for Fiscal Studies and University of Tokyo)

  • Christopher Taber

    (Institute for Fiscal Studies)


The goal of this paper is to use a semiparametric reduced form model to estimate the effects of various tuition subsidies. This approach expands on the tuition subsidy example in Ichimura and Taber (2000) in a number of dimensions. It has become common practice in the empirical literature to refer to any nonstructural empirical analysis as "reduced form." This is not the traditional sense of the phrase. A classic reduced form analysis (see e.g. Marschak, 1953) first specifies a structural model and then derives the reduced form parameters in terms of the structural parameters. While many recent studies have asserted to taking a reduced form approach, the structural parameters. While many recent studies have asserted to taking a reduced form approach, the structural model which the reduced form model should correspond is rarely specified. We explicitly specify a structural model and use the implied reduced form structure to estimate the effect of tuition subsidy policies. Specifying the underlying model has the advantage of being explicit about the assumptions that justify the analysis. This avoids Rosenzweig and Wolpin's (2000) criticism of work on natural 'natural experiments' that often leaves these conditions implicit. Our structural model is based on the model studied by Keane and Wolpin (1999). It is highly nonlinear and allows for more unobserved heterogeneity than the typical simultaneous equations framework that most previous work has used in reduced form estimation. Using hte specified structural model, we examine the assumptions discussed in Ichimura and Taber (2000) to justify reduced form estimation of the policy effects

Suggested Citation

  • Hidehiko Ichimura & Christopher Taber, 2002. "Semiparametric reduced form estimation of tuition subsidies," CeMMAP working papers CWP01/02, Centre for Microdata Methods and Practice, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  • Handle: RePEc:ifs:cemmap:01/02

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Kenneth I. Wolpin & Mark R. Rosenzweig, 2000. "Natural "Natural Experiments" in Economics," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 38(4), pages 827-874, December.
    2. Hidehiko Ichimura & Christopher R. Taber, 2000. "Direct Estimation of Policy Impacts," NBER Technical Working Papers 0254, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Keane, Michael P & Wolpin, Kenneth I, 2001. "The Effect of Parental Transfers and Borrowing Constraints on Educational Attainment," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 42(4), pages 1051-1103, November.
    4. Ichimura, H., 1991. "Semiparametric Least Squares (sls) and Weighted SLS Estimation of Single- Index Models," Papers 264, Minnesota - Center for Economic Research.
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    Cited by:

    1. Petra Todd & Kenneth I. Wolpin, 2002. "Using a Social Experiment to Validate a Dynamic Behavioral Model of Child Schooling and Fertility: Assessing the Impact of a School Subsidy Program in Mexico," PIER Working Paper Archive 03-022, Penn Institute for Economic Research, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania, revised 01 Sep 2003.
    2. Otto Toivanen & Lotta Väänänen, 2016. "Education and Invention," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 98(2), pages 382-396, May.
    3. Laroque, Guy & Salanié, Bernard, 2005. "Does Fertility Respond to Financial Incentives?," CEPR Discussion Papers 5007, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    4. Petra E. Todd & Kenneth I. Wolpin, 2006. "Ex Ante Evaluation of Social Programs," PIER Working Paper Archive 06-022, Penn Institute for Economic Research, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania.
    5. Chen, Zhenhua & Rose, Adam Z. & Prager, Fynnwin & Chatterjee, Samrat, 2017. "Economic consequences of aviation system disruptions: A reduced-form computable general equilibrium analysis," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 95(C), pages 207-226.
    6. Riphahn, Regina T., 2004. "The Enrollment Effect of Secondary School Fees in Post-War Germany," IZA Discussion Papers 1295, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. Rothe, Christoph, 2010. "Nonparametric estimation of distributional policy effects," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 155(1), pages 56-70, March.
    8. Mario Fiorini, 2012. "Fostering Educational Enrolment Through Subsidies: The Issue Of Timing," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 27(5), pages 741-772, August.
    9. Gabriel Ulyssea, 2014. "Firms, Informality and Development: Theory and evidence from Brazil," Textos para discussão 632, Department of Economics PUC-Rio (Brazil).
    10. Avner Ahituv & Robert Lerman, 2011. "Job turnover, wage rates, and marital stability: How are they related?," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 9(2), pages 221-249, June.

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