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Sensitivity Analysis Of Job-Training Effects On Reemployment For Korean Women

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  • Myoung-jae Lee

    () (Department of Economics, Korea University)

  • Sang-jun Lee

Abstract

The main difficulty in treatment effect analysis with matching is accounting for unobserved differences (i.e., selection problem) between the treatment and control groups, because matching assumes no such differences. The traditional way to tackle the difficulty has been ¡®control function¡¯ approaches with selection correction terms. This paper examines relatively new approaches: sensitivity analyses?sensitivity to unobservables?in Rosenbaum (1987), Gastwirth et al. (1998), and Lee (2004). These sensitivity analyses are applied to the data used in Lee and Lee (2005) to see how the assumption of no unobserved difference in matching affects the findings in Lee and Lee, to compare how the different sensitivity analyses perform, and to relate the ¡®sensitivity parameters¡¯ in the different sensitivity analyses to one another. We find (i) the conclusions in Lee and Lee are weakened in the sense that only the ¡®strong¡¯ ones survive, (ii) the sensitivity analysis in Rosenbaum (1987) is too conservative (and inferior to Gastwirth et al.¡¯s), and (iii) Gastwirth et al.¡¯s (1998) and Lee¡¯s (2004) approaches agree on some findings to be insensitive, but the two approaches also disagree on some other findings. We also look for ¡®comparable values¡¯ for the sensitivity parameters such that the resulting sensitivity findings are comparable across the different sensitivity analyses.

Suggested Citation

  • Myoung-jae Lee & Sang-jun Lee, 2007. "Sensitivity Analysis Of Job-Training Effects On Reemployment For Korean Women," Discussion Paper Series 0720, Institute of Economic Research, Korea University.
  • Handle: RePEc:iek:wpaper:0720
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    5. Hujer, Reinhard & Caliendo, Marco & Thomsen, Stephan L., 2004. "New evidence on the effects of job creation schemes in Germany--a matching approach with threefold heterogeneity," Research in Economics, Elsevier, vol. 58(4), pages 257-302, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Chang, Pao-Li & Lee, Myoung-Jae, 2011. "The WTO trade effect," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 85(1), pages 53-71, September.
    2. Kuchibhotla, Murali, 2013. "Three essays in development economics," ISU General Staff Papers 201301010800004461, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    3. Lee, Myoung-jae, 2012. "Treatment effects in sample selection models and their nonparametric estimation," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 167(2), pages 317-329.
    4. Chung Choe & Alfonso Flores-Lagunes & Sang-Jun Lee, 2015. "Do dropouts with longer training exposure benefit from training programs? Korean evidence employing methods for continuous treatments," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 48(2), pages 849-881, March.

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    Keywords

    matching; sample selection; sensitivity analysis; job training;

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