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Novelas y fertilidad: elementos de juicio de Brasil

  • Eliana La Ferrara
  • Alberto Chong

    ()

  • Suzanne Duryea

Este trabajo se concentra en las decisiones relacionadas con la fertilidad en Brasil, un país donde las novelas usualmente muestran familias mucho más reducidas que en la realidad, para analizar la influencia de la televisión en el comportamiento del individuo. Usando datos del censo correspondientes al período de 1970 a 1991, este trabajo revela que las mujeres que viven en zonas a las que llega la señal de Globo tienen un nivel de fertilidad considerablemente más bajo. El efecto es más notorio en el caso de mujeres de nivel socioeconómico más bajo y mujeres en las etapas media y avanzada de su ciclo menstrual (de fertilidad). Por último, el trabajo muestra indicios de que lo que influye en las decisiones individuales son las novelas específicamente, más que la televisión en general.

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Paper provided by Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department in its series Research Department Publications with number 4574.

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Date of creation: Jun 2008
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Handle: RePEc:idb:wpaper:4574
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  1. Stefano DellaVigna & Ethan Kaplan, 2006. "The Fox News Effect: Media Bias and Voting," NBER Working Papers 12169, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Timothy Besley & Robin Burgess, 2002. "The Political Economy Of Government Responsiveness: Theory And Evidence From India," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 117(4), pages 1415-1451, November.
  3. Benjamin A. Olken, 2009. "Do Television and Radio Destroy Social Capital? Evidence from Indonesian Villages," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 1(4), pages 1-33, October.
  4. Gordon Dahl & Stefano DellaVigna, 2007. "Does Movie Violence Increase Violent Crime?," Levine's Working Paper Archive 122247000000001778, David K. Levine.
  5. David Lam & Suzanne Duryea, 1999. "Effects of Schooling on Fertility, Labor Supply, and Investments in Children, with Evidence from Brazil," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 34(1), pages 160-192.
  6. Joseph Potter & Carl Schmertmann & Suzana Cavenaghi, 2002. "Fertility and development: evidence from Brazil," Demography, Springer, vol. 39(4), pages 739-761, November.
  7. Matthew Gentzkow & Jesse M. Shapiro, 2006. "Does Television Rot Your Brain? New Evidence from the Coleman Study," NBER Working Papers 12021, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Matthew Gentzkow, 2006. "Television and Voter Turnout," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 121(3), pages 931-972, 08.
  9. Robert Jensen & Emily Oster, 2009. "The Power of TV: Cable Television and Women's Status in India," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 124(3), pages 1057-1094, August.
  10. David Strömberg, 2004. "Radio's Impact on Public Spending," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 119(1), pages 189-221, February.
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