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Children's Advancement Through School in Brazil: The Role of Transitory Shocks to Household Income

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  • Suzanne Duryea

Abstract

This paper investigates the effects of short-run economic shocks on children`s progress through school in urban Brazil using a unique panel data set. The severe problem of grade repetition in Brazil contributes to overall low education levels. Of children ages 10-15 who are enrolled in school, only 69 percent advance on average to the next grade. This paper investigates whether children`s effort on schoolwork is diminished when parents experience a transitory shock to income.

Suggested Citation

  • Suzanne Duryea, 1998. "Children's Advancement Through School in Brazil: The Role of Transitory Shocks to Household Income," Research Department Publications 4124, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
  • Handle: RePEc:idb:wpaper:4124
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    Cited by:

    1. Skoufias, Emmanuel, 2003. "Economic Crises and Natural Disasters: Coping Strategies and Policy Implications," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 31(7), pages 1087-1102, July.
    2. Ricardo Hausmann & Roberto Rigobon, 2003. "An Alternative Interpretation of the 'Resource Curse': Theory and Policy Implications," NBER Working Papers 9424, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Suzanne Duryea & Jere R. Behrman & Miguel Székely, 1999. "Schooling Investments and Macroeconomic Conditions: A Micro-Macro Investigation for Latin America and the Caribbean," Research Department Publications 4184, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
    4. Suzanne Duryea & Miguel Székely, 1998. "Los mercados laborales en América Latina: el argumento de la oferta," Research Department Publications 4121, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
    5. Nathalie Mathieu-Bolh, 2011. "Optimal taxation and borrowing constraints," Economía, Instituto de Investigaciones Económicas y Sociales (IIES). Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Sociales. Universidad de Los Andes. Mérida, Venezuela, vol. 36(31), pages 9-53, January-j.
    6. World Bank, 2001. "Brazil : Assessment of the Bolsa Escola Programs," World Bank Other Operational Studies 15705, The World Bank.
    7. Drusilla K. Brown & Alan V. Deardorff & Robert M. Stern, 2009. "The Effects of Multinational Production on Wages and Working Conditions in Developing Countries," World Scientific Book Chapters,in: Globalization And International Trade Policies, chapter 17, pages 623-687 World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
    8. Suzanne Duryea & Jere R. Behrman & Miguel Székely, 1999. "Inversiones en enseñanza y condiciones macroeconómicas: investigación micro-macro de América Latina y el Caribe," Research Department Publications 4185, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
    9. Patrick M. Emerson & André Portela Souza, 2011. "Is Child Labor Harmful? The Impact of Working Earlier in Life on Adult Earnings," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 59(2), pages 345-385.
    10. Skoufias, Emmanual & Parker, Susan W., 2002. "Labor market shocks and their impacts on work and schooling," FCND discussion papers 129, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    11. Dasgupta, Basab & Ajwad, Mohamed Ihsan, 2011. "Income shocks reduce human capital investments : evidence from five east European countries," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5926, The World Bank.
    12. Kazianga, Harounan, 2012. "Income Risk and Household Schooling Decisions in Burkina Faso," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(8), pages 1647-1662.
    13. World Bank, 2001. "Brazil : Eradicating Child Labor in Brazil," World Bank Other Operational Studies 15465, The World Bank.
    14. Levison, Deborah & Moe, Karine S. & Marie Knaul, Felicia, 2001. "Youth Education and Work in Mexico," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 167-188, January.
    15. Suzanne Duryea & Miguel Székely, 1998. "Labor Markets in Latin America: A Supply-Side Story," Research Department Publications 4120, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
    16. Cortes Neri, Marcelo & Gustafsson-Wright, Emily & Sedlacek, Guilherme & Orazem, Peter F., 2005. "The responses of child labor, school enrollment, and grade repetition to the loss of parental earnings in Brazil, 1982-1999," Social Protection and Labor Policy and Technical Notes 32743, The World Bank.
    17. Mendez, Oscar & Cutler, David & Knaul, Felicia & Lozano, Rafael & Zurita, Beatriz, 2002. "Financial Crisis, Health Outcomes, and Aging: Mexico in the 1980s and 1990s," Scholarly Articles 2707939, Harvard University Department of Economics.
    18. Emmanuel Skoufias & Susan Parker, 2006. "Job loss and family adjustments in work and schooling during the Mexican peso crisis," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 19(1), pages 163-181, February.

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