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The Design of R&D Support Schemes for Industry

Author

Listed:
  • Russell Thomson

    (Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne; Intellectual Property Research Institute of Australia, The University of Melbourne)

  • Elizabeth Webster

    (Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne; Intellectual Property Research Institute of Australia, The University of Melbourne)

Abstract

Scant discussion exists in the literature about the relative design merits of various R&D schemes and most authors treat program design as a black box. In this paper, we assess the design features of three major forms of R&D support: entitlement schemes, competitive schemes and industry R&D boards. We use a combination of evidence to comment on how well these schemes perform in terms of: firm engagement (how does the scheme recruit business interest?); project selection (what criteria are used and who selects the projects?); payment structure (how is financial support structured?) and administrative costs (what is the burden?).

Suggested Citation

  • Russell Thomson & Elizabeth Webster, 2011. "The Design of R&D Support Schemes for Industry," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2011n24, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
  • Handle: RePEc:iae:iaewps:wp2011n24
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Russell Thomson, 2010. "Tax Policy and R&D Investment by Australian Firms," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 86(273), pages 260-280, June.
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    7. Richardson, Martin & Wilkie, Simon, 1995. "Incremental R&D Subsidies," Journal of Regulatory Economics, Springer, vol. 7(2), pages 161-175, March.
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    12. Klaassen, Ger & Miketa, Asami & Larsen, Katarina & Sundqvist, Thomas, 2005. "The impact of R&D on innovation for wind energy in Denmark, Germany and the United Kingdom," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(2-3), pages 227-240, August.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    R&D policy; tax concession; government grants; R&D boards; R&D support;

    JEL classification:

    • L52 - Industrial Organization - - Regulation and Industrial Policy - - - Industrial Policy; Sectoral Planning Methods
    • O25 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Development Planning and Policy - - - Industrial Policy
    • O32 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Management of Technological Innovation and R&D
    • O38 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Government Policy

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