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Gender Inequality and the Sex Ratio in Three Emerging Economies

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  • Prabir C. Bhattacharya

Abstract

The aim of this paper is to study inequality and deprivations as reflected in the human sex ratio (commonly defined as the number of males per 100 females). The particular focus is on three emerging economies, viz., Russia, India and China. The paper compares and contrasts the experiences of these countries and discusses policy issues. It is noted that while the feminist perspective on the issues surrounding the sex ratio is important, it would be wrong to view these issues always or exclusively through the prism of that perspective . It is also suggested that India and China probably have better prospects of sustained economic growth in the foreseeable future than does Russia.

Suggested Citation

  • Prabir C. Bhattacharya, 2012. "Gender Inequality and the Sex Ratio in Three Emerging Economies," Heriot-Watt University Economics Discussion Papers 1201, Department of Economics, School of Management and Languages, Heriot Watt University.
  • Handle: RePEc:hwe:hwuedp:1201
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Antara Bhattacharyya & Sushil Kr. Haldar, 2020. "Socio-economic development and child sex ratio in India: revisiting the debate using spatial panel data regression," Journal of Social and Economic Development, Springer;Institute for Social and Economic Change, vol. 22(2), pages 305-327, December.
    2. Yang, Tingzhong & Barnett, Ross & Jiang, Shuhan & Yu, Lingwei & Xian, Hong & Ying, Jun & Zheng, Weijun, 2016. "Gender balance and its impact on male and female smoking rates in Chinese cities," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 154(C), pages 9-17.

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