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What Small Countries Can Teach the World

Listed author(s):
  • Frankel, Jeffrey A.

In the past, various great powers have taken the stage as models of economic and social development. Examples such as Great Britain, the Soviet Union, Japan, and the United States have had their time in the spotlight that has come and gone as flaws were exposed; and other countries have learned what they did well and what they did poorly. The great powers are not the only models, however. Much can be learned from small countries which are often free to experiment with new institutions and new policies. This paper describes lessons that can be learned from such countries though no one size fits all.

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File URL: http://dash.harvard.edu/bitstream/handle/1/8694935/Frankel-WhatSmall.pdf
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Paper provided by Harvard Kennedy School of Government in its series Scholarly Articles with number 8694935.

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Date of creation: 2012
Publication status: Published in Business Economics
Handle: RePEc:hrv:hksfac:8694935
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  1. Frankel, Jeffrey A. & Vegh, Carlos A. & Vuletin, Guillermo, 2013. "On graduation from fiscal procyclicality," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 100(1), pages 32-47.
  2. Jeffrey A. Frankel, 2011. "Over-optimism in Forecasts by Official Budget Agencies and Its Implications," NBER Working Papers 17239, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Sebastian Edwards & Alejandra Cox Edwards, 2000. "Economic Reforms and Labor Markets: Policy Issues and Lessons from Chile," NBER Working Papers 7646, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Nagel, Jack H., 1998. "Social Choice in a Pluralitarian Democracy: The Politics of Market Liberalization in New Zealand," British Journal of Political Science, Cambridge University Press, vol. 28(02), pages 223-267, April.
  5. Roger H. Gordon, 2010. "Report of the Editor: Journal of Economic Literature," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 100(2), pages 678-679, May.
  6. Gordon H. Hanson, 2010. "Why Isn't Mexico Rich?," NBER Working Papers 16470, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Edwards, Sebastian & Edwards, Alejandra Cox, 1991. "Monetarism and Liberalization," University of Chicago Press Economics Books, University of Chicago Press, edition 1, number 9780226184890.
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