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Irreversibility of time, reversibility of choices? The Life-Course foundations of the Transitional Labour Markets approach

  • Anxo, Dominique


    (Centre for Labour Market Policy Research (CAFO))

  • Erhel, Christine


    (Centre d’Economie de la Sorbonne, Université Paris I Panthéon Sorbonne et CNRS, Centre d’Etudes de l’Emploi, France)

The article analyses the potential links between the life course approach and the Transitional Labour Market (TLM) perspective. It provides some empirical evidence of the role played by age and gender in individuals' situation on the labour market, as well as of the heterogeneity in course patterns in Europe, using available data about employment rates, but also transitions matrices. It develops the theoretical foundations of the life course approach, and shows how it can be articulated with the TLM framework. First, the life course approach provides some insights concerning the determinants of transitions, and their differentiation by age and gender. Second, it offers a conceptualization of time and irreversibility which helps understanding path dependency at both individual level, and underlines the importance of favouring the reversibility of choices through global policy reforms.

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Paper provided by Centre for Labour Market Policy Research (CAFO), School of Business and Economics, Linnaeus University in its series CAFO Working Papers with number 2006:7.

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Length: 30 pages
Date of creation: 20 Feb 2006
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:hhs:vxcafo:2006_007
Contact details of provider: Postal: Centre for Labour Market Policy Research (CAFO), School of Business and Economics, Linnaeus University, SE 351 95 Växjö, Sweden
Phone: +46 470 70 87 64
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  1. Amable, Bruno, 2003. "The Diversity of Modern Capitalism," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199261147, July.
  2. Heckman, James J, 1993. "What Has Been Learned about Labor Supply in the Past Twenty Years?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 83(2), pages 116-21, May.
  3. Gilbert Ghez & Gary S. Becker, 1975. "The Allocation of Time and Goods over the Life Cycle," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number ghez75-1, December.
  4. Becker, G.S., 1991. "Habits, Addictions, and Traditions," University of Chicago - Economics Research Center 91-8, Chicago - Economics Research Center.
  5. Pierre Courtioux & Christine Erhel, 2005. "Les politiques en faveur des seniors en Allemagne, en France, au Royaume-Uni et en Suède : quelles voies de réformes ?," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) halshs-00271892, HAL.
  6. Gary S. Becker & Casey B. Mulligan, 1997. "The Endogenous Determination of Time Preference," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 112(3), pages 729-758.
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