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Impact of Political News on the Baltic State Stock Markets

  • Soultanaeva, Albina

    ()

    (Department of Economics, Umeå University)

Registered author(s):

    This paper studies the link between political news releases, and the returns and volatilities in the stock markets of Riga, Tallinn and Vilnius. Political news releases are viewed as proxies for political risk. The results indicate that political news events regarding domestic and foreign, excluding Russia, political issues led, on average, to lower uncertainty in the stock markets of Riga and Tallinn in 2001-2003. At the same time, political risk from Russia increased the volatility of the stock market in Tallinn. We found that there is only a weak relationship between political risks of different origins and the stock market volatility in the Baltic states in 2004-2007. In addition, we found a significant Monday effect, consistent with the trading behavior of institutional investors.

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    File URL: http://www.econ.umu.se/DownloadAsset.action?contentId=47965&languageId=3&assetKey=ues735
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    Paper provided by Umeå University, Department of Economics in its series Umeå Economic Studies with number 735.

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    Length: 21 pages
    Date of creation: 27 Mar 2008
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:hhs:umnees:0735
    Contact details of provider: Postal:
    Department of Economics, Umeå University, S-901 87 Umeå, Sweden

    Phone: 090 - 786 61 42
    Fax: 090 - 77 23 02
    Web page: http://www.econ.umu.se/
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    3. Brännäs, Kurt & G De Gooijer, Jan & Lönnbark, Carl & Soultanaeva, Albina, 2007. "Simultaneity and Asymmetry of Returns and Volatilities in the Emerging Baltic State Stock Exchanges," Umeå Economic Studies 725, Umeå University, Department of Economics.
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