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The Determinants of Labor Market Institutions: A Panel Data Study

  • Kim, Jaewon

    ()

    (Dept. of Economics, Stockholm University)

This paper analyzes the argument that labor market institutions can be thought of devices for social insurance. It investigates the hypotheses that a country’s exposure to external risk and ethnic fractionalization are correlated with labor market institutions. Extreme bounds analysis with the panel data of 40 years indicates that there is no robust evidence of positive correlation between external risk and the structure of labor market institutions, while ethnic fractionalization is robust negatively correlated with the institutions.

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File URL: http://www2.ne.su.se/paper/wp06_10revised.pdf
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Paper provided by Stockholm University, Department of Economics in its series Research Papers in Economics with number 2006:10.

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Length: 34 pages
Date of creation: 03 Dec 2006
Date of revision: 06 Dec 2006
Handle: RePEc:hhs:sunrpe:2006_0010
Contact details of provider: Postal: Department of Economics, Stockholm, S-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden
Phone: +46 8 16 20 00
Fax: +46 8 16 14 25
Web page: http://www.ne.su.se/
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  1. Nickell, Stephen & Layard, Richard, 1999. "Labor market institutions and economic performance," Handbook of Labor Economics, in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 46, pages 3029-3084 Elsevier.
  2. Stephen Nickell & Luca Nunziata & Wolfgang Ochel & Glenda Quintini, 2002. "Why do jobless rates differ?," CESifo Forum, Ifo Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 3(1), pages 50-59, 04.
  3. Levine, Ross & Renelt, David, 1992. "A Sensitivity Analysis of Cross-Country Growth Regressions," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(4), pages 942-63, September.
  4. Dani Rodrik, 1996. "Why Do More Open Economies Have Bigger Governments?," NBER Working Papers 5537, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Stephen Nickell, 1997. "Unemployment and Labor Market Rigidities: Europe versus North America," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 11(3), pages 55-74, Summer.
  6. Koeniger, Winfried, 2001. "Trade, Labor Market Rigidities, and Government-Financed Technological Change," IZA Discussion Papers 241, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  7. Dani Rodrik, 1997. "What Drives Public Employment?," NBER Working Papers 6141, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Alberto Alesina & Reza Baqir & William Easterly, 1997. "Public Goods and Ethnic Divisions," NBER Working Papers 6009, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  9. Wacziarg, Romain & Alesina, Alberto, 1998. "Openness, Country Size and Government," Scholarly Articles 4553014, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  10. Widmalm, Frida, 2001. " Tax Structure and Growth: Are Some Taxes Better Than Others?," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 107(3-4), pages 199-219, June.
  11. Svaleryd, Helena & Vlachos, Jonas, 1999. "Markets for Risk and Openness to Trade: How are they Related?," SSE/EFI Working Paper Series in Economics and Finance 327, Stockholm School of Economics, revised 10 Sep 2000.
  12. Easterly, W & Levine, R, 1996. "Africa's Growth Tragedy : Policies and Ethnic Divisions," Papers 536, Harvard - Institute for International Development.
  13. Olivier Blanchard & Justin Wolfers, 1999. "The Role of Shocks and Institutions in the Rise of European Unemployment: The Aggregate Evidence," NBER Working Papers 7282, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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