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Dynamic Trading Strategies and Portfolio Choice

Author

Listed:
  • Bansal, Ravi

    (Duke University)

  • Dahlquist, Magnus

    (Swedish Institute for Financial Research)

  • Harvey, Campbell R.

    () (Duke University)

Abstract

Traditional mean-variance efficient portfolios do not capture the potential wealth creation opportunities provided by predictability of asset returns. We propose a simple method for constructing optimally managed portfolios that exploits the possibility that asset returns are predictable. We implement these portfolios in both single and multi-period horizon settings. We compare alternative portfolio strategies which include both buy-and-hold and fixed weight portfolios. We find that managed portfolios can significantly improve the mean-variance trade-off, in particular, for investors with investment horizons of three to five years. Also, in contrast to popular advice, we show that the buy-and-hold strategy should be avoided.

Suggested Citation

  • Bansal, Ravi & Dahlquist, Magnus & Harvey, Campbell R., 2004. "Dynamic Trading Strategies and Portfolio Choice," SIFR Research Report Series 31, Institute for Financial Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:sifrwp:0031
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    3. John Y. Campbell & Luis M. Viceira, 1999. "Consumption and Portfolio Decisions when Expected Returns are Time Varying," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 114(2), pages 433-495.
    4. Keim, Donald B. & Stambaugh, Robert F., 1986. "Predicting returns in the stock and bond markets," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(2), pages 357-390, December.
    5. Geert Bekaert, 2004. "Conditioning Information and Variance Bounds on Pricing Kernels," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 17(2), pages 339-378.
    6. Campbell, John Y., 1987. "Stock returns and the term structure," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(2), pages 373-399, June.
    7. Balduzzi, Pierluigi & Lynch, Anthony W., 1999. "Transaction costs and predictability: some utility cost calculations," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(1), pages 47-78, April.
    8. Harvey, Campbell R., 1989. "Time-varying conditional covariances in tests of asset pricing models," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(2), pages 289-317.
    9. Fama, Eugene F. & French, Kenneth R., 1988. "Dividend yields and expected stock returns," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 3-25, October.
    10. Wayne E. Ferson, 2001. "The Efficient Use of Conditioning Information in Portfolios," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 56(3), pages 967-982, June.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Caicedo-Llano, Juliana & Dionysopoulos, Thomas, 2008. "Market integration: A risk-budgeting guide for pure alpha investors," Journal of Multinational Financial Management, Elsevier, vol. 18(4), pages 313-327, October.
    2. Makarov, Dmitry & Schornick, Astrid V., 2010. "A note on wealth effect under CARA utility," Finance Research Letters, Elsevier, vol. 7(3), pages 170-177, September.
    3. Chiang, I-Hsuan Ethan, 2015. "Modern portfolio management with conditioning information," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 114-134.
    4. Peñaranda, Francisco & Sentana, Enrique, 2016. "Duality in mean-variance frontiers with conditioning information," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 38(PB), pages 762-785.
    5. Fletcher, Jonathan & Basu, Devraj, 2016. "An examination of the benefits of dynamic trading strategies in U.K. closed-end funds," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 109-118.
    6. Suleyman Basak & Georgy Chabakauri, 2010. "Dynamic Mean-Variance Asset Allocation," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 23(8), pages 2970-3016, August.
    7. Peñaranda, Francisco, 2009. "Understanding portfolio efficiency with conditioning information," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 24415, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Dynamic strategies; mean-variance optimization; multiperiod choice; efficient frontier; buy-and-hold investment;

    JEL classification:

    • G11 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Portfolio Choice; Investment Decisions
    • G12 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Asset Pricing; Trading Volume; Bond Interest Rates

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