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Labour supply and retirement policy in an overlapping generations model with stochastic fertility




Using a stochastic general equilibrium model with overlapping generations, this paper studies a policy rule for the retirement age aiming at offsetting the effects on the supply of labour following fertility changes. We find that the retirement age should increase more than proportionally to the direct fall in the labour supply caused by a fall in fertility. The robustness of this result is checked against alternative model specifications and parameter values. The efficacy of the policy rule depends crucially on the link between the preference for leisure and the response of the intensive margin of labour supply to changes in the statutory retirement age.

Suggested Citation

  • Jørgensen, Ole Hagen & Jensen, Svend E. Hougaard, 2009. "Labour supply and retirement policy in an overlapping generations model with stochastic fertility," Discussion Papers of Business and Economics 1/2009, University of Southern Denmark, Department of Business and Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:sdueko:2009_001

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Kevin M. Murphy & Finis Welch, 1992. "The Structure of Wages," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 107(1), pages 285-326.
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    7. Magnus Jonsson, 2007. "The welfare cost of imperfect competition and distortionary taxation," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 10(4), pages 576-594, October.
    8. Cardia, Emanuela, 1997. "Replicating Ricardian Equivalence Tests with Simulated Series," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 87(1), pages 65-79, March.
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    More about this item


    Labour supply; fertility; retirement age; overlapping generations; method of undetermined coefficients;

    JEL classification:

    • D91 - Microeconomics - - Micro-Based Behavioral Economics - - - Role and Effects of Psychological, Emotional, Social, and Cognitive Factors on Decision Making
    • E20 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - General (includes Measurement and Data)
    • H55 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Social Security and Public Pensions
    • J10 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - General
    • J26 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Retirement; Retirement Policies


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