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How should the allocation of resources adjust to the baby bust?

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  • DE LA CROIX, David
  • MAHIEU, Géraldine
  • RILLAERS, Alexandra

Abstract

We analyze the impact of a drop in fertility on the optimal allocation of resources in an overlapping generations economy where old workers care about leisure. We also characterize optimal dynamics and study the decentralization of the optimum by means of inter‐generational transfers and/or public debt. We conclude that the policy recommendations of postponing retirement is fragile and depend on preferences and technologies. Also, even when the optimal adjustment of public debt goes into the expected direction in the long run—i.e., public debt should decrease—this may not be the case during the transition.
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  • DE LA CROIX, David & MAHIEU, Géraldine & RILLAERS, Alexandra, 2004. "How should the allocation of resources adjust to the baby bust?," LIDAM Reprints CORE 1741, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE).
  • Handle: RePEc:cor:louvrp:1741
    DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-9779.2004.00183.x
    Note: In : Journal of Public Economic Theory, 6(4), 607-636, 2004
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    Cited by:

    1. de la Croix, David & Pierrard, Olivier & Sneessens, Henri R., 2013. "Aging and pensions in general equilibrium: Labor market imperfections matter," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 104-124.
    2. Jensen, Svend E. Hougaard & Jorgensen, Ole Hagen, 2010. "Reform and backlash to reform : economic effects of ageing and retirement policy," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5470, The World Bank.
    3. de la Croix, David & Pierrard, Olivier & Sneessens, Henri R., 2013. "Aging and pensions in general equilibrium: Labor market imperfections matter," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 104-124.
    4. David Croix & Pierre Pestieau & Grégory Ponthière, 2012. "How powerful is demography? The Serendipity Theorem revisited," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 25(3), pages 899-922, July.
    5. Pierre Pestieau & Gregory Ponthiere, 2014. "Optimal fertility along the life cycle," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 55(1), pages 185-224, January.
    6. Jørgensen, Ole Hagen & Jensen, Svend E. Hougaard, 2009. "Labour supply and retirement policy in an overlapping generations model with stochastic fertility," Discussion Papers of Business and Economics 1/2009, University of Southern Denmark, Department of Business and Economics.
    7. Alessandro Sommacal, 2006. "Pension systems and intragenenerational redistribution when labor supply is endogenous," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 58(3), pages 379-406, July.
    8. Andersen, Torben M, 2008. "Fiscal Sustainability and Demographics - Should We Save or Work More?," CEPR Discussion Papers 7044, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    9. Anna Batyra & David de la Croix & Olivier Pierrard & Henri Sneessens, 2016. "Structural changes in the labor market and the rise of early retirement in Europe," LIDAM Discussion Papers IRES 2016022, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).
    10. Batyra, Anna & de la Croix, David & Pierrard, Olivier & Sneessens, Henri R., 2013. "Declining bargaining power of workers and the rise of early retirement in Europe," GIAM Working Papers 13-6, Galatasaray University Economic Research Center.
    11. Jorgensen, Ole Hagen, 2011. "Macroeconomic and policy implications of population aging in Brazil," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5519, The World Bank.
    12. Jorgensen, Ole Hagen & Jensen, Svend E. Hougaard, 2010. "Labor supply and retirement policy in an overlapping generations model with stochastic fertility," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5382, The World Bank.
    13. Andersen, Torben M., 2012. "Fiscal sustainability and demographics – Should we save or work more?," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 34(2), pages 264-280.

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E62 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Fiscal Policy
    • H55 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Social Security and Public Pensions
    • O41 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - One, Two, and Multisector Growth Models

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