IDEAS home Printed from
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

The Big, the Bad and the Average: Hedonic Prices and Inverse Demand for Baltic Cod

Registered author(s):

    The price of fish depends on quality attributes such as size and freshness. In turn, quality attributes are related to fishery management. This article presents a hedonic analysis where attribute prices of size and quality ratings are estimated for the Swedish Baltic Cod Fishery. Using information from 5307 landing days, hedonic inverse demand functions are estimated with a random coefficient model. Results show that there are price premiums for larger sizes of cod and for cod with the highest quality rating. Results also show that own- quantity effects and cross-quantity effects are negative for most attributes. Thus, there is indication that the quality composition of landed fish affect the prices of quality attributes and that the management of a fish stock that changes the quantity of attributes will also change the prices of fish.

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: no

    Paper provided by Lund University, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 2013:34.

    in new window

    Length: 26 pages
    Date of creation: 10 Oct 2013
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:hhs:lunewp:2013_034
    Contact details of provider: Postal: Department of Economics, School of Economics and Management, Lund University, Box 7082, S-220 07 Lund,Sweden
    Phone: +46 +46 222 0000
    Fax: +46 +46 2224613
    Web page:

    More information through EDIRC

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

    as in new window
    1. Dadi Kristofersson & Kyrre Rickertsen, 2004. "Efficient Estimation of Hedonic Inverse Input Demand Systems," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 86(4), pages 1127-1137.
    2. Doring, Ralf & Egelkraut, Thorsten M., 2008. "Investing in natural capital as management strategy in fisheries: The case of the Baltic Sea cod fishery," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 64(3), pages 634-642, January.
    3. Patrick Bajari & Matthew E. Kahn, 2005. "Estimating Housing Demand With an Application to Explaining Racial Segregation in Cities," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 23, pages 20-33, January.
    4. Lars J. Ravn-Jonsen, 2009. "Intertemporal Choice of Marine Ecosystem Exploitation," Working Papers 88/09, University of Southern Denmark, Department of Environmental and Business Economics.
    5. Ekeland, Ivar & Heckman, James J. & Nesheim, Lars, 2003. "Identification and Estimation of Hedonic Models," IZA Discussion Papers 853, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    6. Sherry L. Larkin & Gilbert Sylvia, 1999. "Intrinsic Fish Characteristics and Intraseason Production Efficiency: A Management-Level Bioeconomic Analysis of a Commercial Fishery," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 81(1), pages 29-43.
    7. Palmquist, Raymond B, 1984. "Estimating the Demand for the Characteristics of Housing," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 66(3), pages 394-404, August.
    8. James N. Brown & Harvey S. Rosen, 1982. "On the Estimation of Structural Hedonic Price Models," NBER Technical Working Papers 0018, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Grafton, R Quentin & Squires, Dale & Fox, Kevin J, 2000. "Private Property and Economic Efficiency: A Study of a Common-Pool Resource," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 43(2), pages 679-713, October.
    10. Rosen, Sherwin, 1974. "Hedonic Prices and Implicit Markets: Product Differentiation in Pure Competition," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 82(1), pages 34-55, Jan.-Feb..
    11. Jeffrey E. Zabel & Katherine A. Kiel, 2000. "Estimating the Demand for Air Quality in Four U.S. Cities," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 76(2), pages 174-194.
    12. Charles D. Kolstad & Michelle H. L. Turnovsky, 1998. "Cost Functions And Nonlinear Prices: Estimating A Technology With Quality-Differentiated Inputs," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 80(3), pages 444-453, August.
    13. Bartik, Timothy J, 1987. "The Estimation of Demand Parameters in Hedonic Price Models," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 95(1), pages 81-88, February.
    14. Z. Wang, 2003. "Hedonic prices for crude oil," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 10(13), pages 857-861.
    15. Kenneth E. McConnell & Ivar E. Strand, 2000. "Hedonic Prices for Fish: Tuna Prices in Hawaii," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 82(1), pages 133-144.
    16. Florian Diekert, 2012. "Growth Overfishing: The Race to Fish Extends to the Dimension of Size," Environmental & Resource Economics, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 52(4), pages 549-572, August.
    17. Epple, Dennis, 1987. "Hedonic Prices and Implicit Markets: Estimating Demand and Supply Functions for Differentiated Products," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 95(1), pages 59-80, February.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:hhs:lunewp:2013_034. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (David Edgerton)

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.