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Do you trust me? – Go Fish! A Study on Trust and Fisheries Management

Author

Listed:
  • Eggert, Håkan

    () (Department of Economics, School of Business, Economics and Law, Göteborg University)

  • Kataria, Mitesh

    () (Department of Economics, School of Business, Economics and Law, Göteborg University)

  • Lampi, Elina

    () (Department of Economics, School of Business, Economics and Law, Göteborg University)

Abstract

This paper investigates trust among stakeholders in fisheries management. We asked the general public, environmental bureaucrats, and recreational and commercial fishers whether they believed various stakeholders have sufficient knowledge to take a stance regarding fisheries management issues in a choice experiment they themselves had just been exposed to. We found that the general public and recreational fishers tend to trust bureaucrats to have sufficient knowledge, while bureaucrats distrust the general public. The commercial fishers in our sample deviate from the other respondents with high self-trust and low trust in both the general public and bureaucrats. In addition, bureaucrats tend to think that their colleagues are more knowledgeable than them. When looking at observable characteristics, we find that, regardless of comparison group, males show higher trust in their own knowledge than do females, and those with higher education believe they are more knowledgeable than people in general.

Suggested Citation

  • Eggert, Håkan & Kataria, Mitesh & Lampi, Elina, 2016. "Do you trust me? – Go Fish! A Study on Trust and Fisheries Management," Working Papers in Economics 675, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:gunwpe:0675
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/2077/48616
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Raakjær Nielsen, Jesper & Mathiesen, Christoph, 2003. "Important factors influencing rule compliance in fisheries lessons from Denmark," Marine Policy, Elsevier, vol. 27(5), pages 409-416, September.
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    4. Fredrik Carlsson & Mitesh Kataria & Elina Lampi, 2011. "Do EPA Administrators Recommend Environmental Policies That Citizens Want?," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 87(1), pages 60-74.
    5. Jeffrey M Wooldridge, 2010. "Econometric Analysis of Cross Section and Panel Data," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 2, volume 1, number 0262232588, September.
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    7. Brad M. Barber & Terrance Odean, 2001. "Boys will be Boys: Gender, Overconfidence, and Common Stock Investment," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 116(1), pages 261-292.
    8. Jentoft, Svein, 1989. "Fisheries co-management , : Delegating government responsibility to fishermen's organizations," Marine Policy, Elsevier, vol. 13(2), pages 137-154, April.
    9. Eggert, Håkan & Kataria, Mitesh & Lampi, Elina, 2016. "Difference in Preferences or in Preference Orderings? Comparing Choices of Environmental Bureaucrats, Recreational Anglers, and the Public," Working Papers in Economics 669, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
    10. Jean‐Pierre Benoît & Juan Dubra, 2011. "Apparent Overconfidence," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 79(5), pages 1591-1625, September.
    11. Jerry Hausman, 2012. "Contingent Valuation: From Dubious to Hopeless," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 26(4), pages 43-56, Fall.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Trust; Fisheries Management; Overconfidence; Choice experiment;

    JEL classification:

    • Q22 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Fishery

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