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Metropolitan Regions and Product Innovation


  • Bjerke, Lina

    () (CESIS - Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies, Royal Institute of Technology)

  • Karlsson, Charlie

    () (CESIS - Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies, Royal Institute of Technology)


In smaller countries, the non-metropolitan regions are to a substantial degree linked together with the metropolitan regions through various networks. The national infrastructure and transport networks are often organised with the metropolitan region as the central hub. This creates a number of dependencies between the metropolitan region and the non-metropolitan regions in a small country. In this paper we focus on the role that metropolitan regions play for the renewal of the export base in the non-metropolitan regions in a small country. The analytical part can be divided into three main parts: i) the role of the Stockholm metropolitan region for the renewal of the export base in the rest of Sweden between 1997 and 2003; ii) which non-metropolitan regions gain renewal of their export base; and iii) what factors can explain the spatial distribution of these gains. The results show that distance has little to do with the potential success of an export products diffused from Stockholm. Instead, regional characteristics such as a large manufacturing sector, educational level, size of public and/or agricultural sector, and access to producer services have a larger influential potential.

Suggested Citation

  • Bjerke, Lina & Karlsson, Charlie, 2009. "Metropolitan Regions and Product Innovation," Working Paper Series in Economics and Institutions of Innovation 166, Royal Institute of Technology, CESIS - Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:cesisp:0166

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Urban Gråsjö & Charlie Karlsson, 2014. "Accessibility: an underused analytical and empirical tool in spatial economics," Chapters,in: Accessibility and Spatial Interaction, chapter 11, pages 211-236 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    2. Ana Condeço-Melhorado & Aura Reggiani & Javier Gutiérrez (ed.), 2014. "Accessibility and Spatial Interaction," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 15267.

    More about this item


    metropolitan regions; exports; product innovation; networks; diffusion;

    JEL classification:

    • D85 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Network Formation
    • F10 - International Economics - - Trade - - - General
    • R10 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - General
    • R11 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Regional Economic Activity: Growth, Development, Environmental Issues, and Changes
    • R12 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Size and Spatial Distributions of Regional Economic Activity; Interregional Trade (economic geography)

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