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The mining sectors in Chile and Norway, ca. 1870 - 1940: the development of a knowledge gap

Author

Listed:
  • Kristin Ranestad

    (Department of Archaeology, Conservation and History, University of Oslo, Centre for Business History, Copenhagen Business School)

Abstract

Chile and Norway are two ‘natural resource intensive economies’, which have had different development trajectories, yet are closely similar in industrial structure and geophysical conditions. The questions of how and why Chile and Norway have developed so differently are explored through an analysis of how knowledge accumulation occurred and how it was transformed by learning into technological innovation in mining, a sector which has long traditions in Norway and has by far been the largest export sector in Chile for centuries. Similar types of ‘knowledge organisations’ with the direct aim of developing knowledge for mining were developed in both countries. Formal mining education, scientifically trained professionals, organisations for technology transfer and geological mapping and ore surveys are compared in search of differences which may explain the underlying reasons for variations in economic growth.

Suggested Citation

  • Kristin Ranestad, 2016. "The mining sectors in Chile and Norway, ca. 1870 - 1940: the development of a knowledge gap," Working Papers 0105, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).
  • Handle: RePEc:hes:wpaper:0105
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    File URL: http://www.ehes.org/EHES_105.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Engerman, Stanley L. & Sokoloff, Kenneth L., 2005. "The Evolution of Suffrage Institutions in the New World," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 65(04), pages 891-921, December.
    2. Simon Ville & Olav Wicken, 2013. "The dynamics of resource-based economic development: evidence from Australia and Norway," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 22(5), pages 1341-1371, October.
    3. David Jacobson & Hartmut Hirsch-Kreinsen & Keith Smith & Staffan Laestadius, "undated". "Low-Tech Industries and the Knowledge Economy: State of the Art and Research Challenges," STEP Report series 200316, The STEP Group, Studies in technology, innovation and economic policy.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Knowledge in Mining does matter. But not any Knowledge.
      by mlmorell in NEP-HIS blog on 2017-07-25 08:11:04

    More about this item

    Keywords

    natural intensive economies; Chile; Norway; mining; innovation; mining education; technical education; knowledge organisations;

    JEL classification:

    • N30 - Economic History - - Labor and Consumers, Demography, Education, Health, Welfare, Income, Wealth, Religion, and Philanthropy - - - General, International, or Comparative
    • N50 - Economic History - - Agriculture, Natural Resources, Environment and Extractive Industries - - - General, International, or Comparative
    • L72 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Primary Products and Construction - - - Mining, Extraction, and Refining: Other Nonrenewable Resources

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