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Rhythms and Cycles in Happiness

Author

Listed:
  • Wolfgang Maennig

    () (Chair for Economic Policy, University of Hamburg)

  • Malte Steenbeck

    () (Chair for Economic Policy, University of Hamburg)

  • Markus Wilhelm

    () (Chair for Economic Policy, University of Hamburg)

Abstract

This study analyses time-dependent rhythms in happiness in three aspects. We show that the Sunday neurosis exists exclusively for men with a medium level of education and both men and women with high levels of education. Men with high levels of education may even experience a weekend neurosis. This study is the first to test for intra-monthly rhythms and to demonstrate that men with a lower educational background may suffer from negative effects on happiness towards the end of the month, potentially due to liquidity problems. The study is also the first to demonstrate that – even when controlling for health and income effects – happiness exhibits seasonal effects over the annual period, depending on gender and education.

Suggested Citation

  • Wolfgang Maennig & Malte Steenbeck & Markus Wilhelm, 2013. "Rhythms and Cycles in Happiness," Working Papers 046, Chair for Economic Policy, University of Hamburg.
  • Handle: RePEc:hce:wpaper:046
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    File URL: http://www.hced.uni-hamburg.de/WorkingPapers/HCED-046.pdf
    File Function: First Version, 2013
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Diederik Boertien & Christian von Scheve & Mona Park, 2012. "Education, Personality and Separation: The Distribution of Relationship Skills across Society," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 487, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    2. Akay, Alpaslan & Martinsson, Peter, 2009. "Sundays Are Blue: Aren’t They? The Day-of-the-Week Effect on Subjective Well-Being and Socio-Economic Status," IZA Discussion Papers 4563, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Arne Feddersen & Wolfgang Maennig, 2005. "Trends in Competitive Balance: Is there Evidence for Growing Imbalance in Professional Sport Leagues?," Working Papers 0012005, Chair for Economic Policy, University of Hamburg.
    4. Wolfgang Maennig & Florian Schwarthoff, 2006. "Stadium Architecture and regional economic development: International experience and the plans of Durban," Working Papers 200604, Chair for Economic Policy, University of Hamburg.
    5. Arne Feddersen, 2006. "Economic Consequences of the UEFA Champions League for National Championships - The Case of Germany," Working Papers 0012006, Chair for Economic Policy, University of Hamburg.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Franziska K. Kruse & Wolfgang Maennig, 2017. "The future development of world records," Working Papers 061, Chair for Economic Policy, University of Hamburg.
    2. Franziska K. Kruse & Wolfgang Maennig, 2018. "Suspension by choice – determinants and asymmetries," Working Papers 064, Chair for Economic Policy, University of Hamburg.
    3. Gabriel M. Ahlfeldt & Wolfgang Maennig & Felix J. Richter, 2017. "Zoning in reunified Berlin," Working Papers 059, Chair for Economic Policy, University of Hamburg.
    4. Adrian Chadi, 2016. "Identification of Attrition Bias Using Different Types of Panel Refreshments," IAAEU Discussion Papers 201602, Institute of Labour Law and Industrial Relations in the European Union (IAAEU).
    5. Wolfgang Maennig, 2017. "Public Referenda and Public Opinion on Olympic Games," Working Papers 057, Chair for Economic Policy, University of Hamburg.
    6. Wolfgang Maennig, 2017. "Governance in Sports Organizations," Working Papers 060, Chair for Economic Policy, University of Hamburg.
    7. repec:spr:jhappi:v:18:y:2017:i:6:d:10.1007_s10902-016-9797-y is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Wolfgang Maennig, 2017. "Major Sports Events: Economic Impact," Working Papers 058, Chair for Economic Policy, University of Hamburg.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Happiness; life satisfaction; weekend neurosis; rhythms in time;

    JEL classification:

    • I31 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General Welfare, Well-Being
    • N70 - Economic History - - Economic History: Transport, International and Domestic Trade, Energy, and Other Services - - - General, International, or Comparative
    • Q48 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Government Policy

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