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Stadium Architecture and regional economic development: International experience and the plans of Durban

Author

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  • Wolfgang Maennig

    () (Chair for Economic Policy, University of Hamburg)

  • Florian Schwarthoff

    (Chair for Economic Policy, University of Hamburg)

Abstract

: For the FIFA World Cup 2010, South Africa plans to invest heavily. The positive economic effects that the country is hoping for stand in contrast to almost all statistical ex-post studies. This contribution emphasises that these results, usually from research under-taken in the USA, can only be generalised to a limited degree. The density of sports venues in developed countries is so high, that the marginal effects of new stadia are necessarily limited. We also emphasise that stadium design around the world was not hitherto adequately targeted towards positive economic effects. The example of Durban and its plans for a new “iconic” stadium is used to illustrate fundamental principles of stadium design and their embedding in a re-urbanisation process that have to be undertaken in order to consciously achieve positive regional economic effects.

Suggested Citation

  • Wolfgang Maennig & Florian Schwarthoff, 2006. "Stadium Architecture and regional economic development: International experience and the plans of Durban," Working Papers 200604, Chair for Economic Policy, University of Hamburg.
  • Handle: RePEc:hce:wpaper:200604
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    File URL: http://www.hced.uni-hamburg.de/WorkingPapers/200604.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Arne Feddersen & Wolfgang Maennig, 2005. "Trends in Competitive Balance: Is there Evidence for Growing Imbalance in Professional Sport Leagues?," Working Papers 0012005, Chair for Economic Policy, University of Hamburg.
    2. Charles C. Tu, 2005. "How Does a New Sports Stadium Affect Housing Values? The Case of FedEx Field," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 81(3).
    3. Carlino, Gerald & Coulson, N. Edward, 2004. "Compensating differentials and the social benefits of the NFL," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 56(1), pages 25-50, July.
    4. Dennis Coates & Brad R. Humphreys, 1999. "The growth effects of sport franchises, stadia, and arenas," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(4), pages 601-624.
    5. Victor A. Matheson & Robert A. Baade, 2004. "Mega-Sporting Events In Developing Nations: Playing The Way To Prosperity?," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 72(5), pages 1085-1096, December.
    6. Dennis Coates & Brad R. Humphreys, 2003. "Professional Sports Facilities, Franchises and Urban Economic Development," UMBC Economics Department Working Papers 03-103, UMBC Department of Economics.
    7. Robert Baade & Victor Matheson, 2004. "The Quest for the Cup: Assessing the Economic Impact of the World Cup," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(4), pages 343-354.
    8. Gabriel Ahlfeldt & Wolfgang Maennig, 2007. "The Role of Architecture on Urban Revitalisation: The Case of Olympic Arenas in Berlin-Prenzlauer Berg," Working Papers 001, Chair for Economic Policy, University of Hamburg.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    stadium architecture; regional economics; sports economics; World Cup; Durban;

    JEL classification:

    • L83 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Services - - - Sports; Gambling; Restaurants; Recreation; Tourism
    • R58 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Regional Government Analysis - - - Regional Development Planning and Policy
    • Z28 - Other Special Topics - - Sports Economics - - - Policy

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