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Geographical and Sectorial Concentration in Czech, Hungarian and Slovak exports

Author

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  • Karoly Attila Soos

    () (Institute of Economics, Centre for Economic and Regional Studies, Hungarian Academy of Sciences)

Abstract

Statistical data display a high level of sectorial and geographical concentration in the exports of three Central European new member states of the European Union: the Czech Republic, Hungary and Slovakia. All the three export huge quantities of the products of certain sectors of engineering industries, and the main destination of their exports are the partner countries in the European Union. In this article, we discuss these issues in a comparative perspective, including into the analysis some other Central–Eastern European (CEE) new EU member states and also some other (non-CEE) EU member states. With more thorough examination we find that both kinds of concentration (which are also interrelated) are at lower levels than it appears in foreign trade statistics, and still rather high in international comparison. Concentration has both positive and negative (dangerous) sides.

Suggested Citation

  • Karoly Attila Soos, 2015. "Geographical and Sectorial Concentration in Czech, Hungarian and Slovak exports," IEHAS Discussion Papers 1548, Institute of Economics, Centre for Economic and Regional Studies, Hungarian Academy of Sciences.
  • Handle: RePEc:has:discpr:1548
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Mona Haddad & Jamus Jerome Lim & Cosimo Pancaro & Christian Saborowski, 2013. "Trade openness reduces growth volatility when countries are well diversified," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 46(2), pages 765-790, May.
    2. Bejan, Maria, 2006. "Trade Openness and Output Volatility," MPRA Paper 2759, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Egger, Peter & Larch, Mario, 2011. "An assessment of the Europe agreements' effects on bilateral trade, GDP, and welfare," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 55(2), pages 263-279, February.
    4. Javad Abedini, 2013. "Heterogeneity of Trade Patterns in High-Tech Goods Across Established and Emerging Exporters: A Panel Data Analysis," Emerging Markets Finance and Trade, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(4), pages 4-21, July.
    5. Shintaro Hamanaka, 2012. "Whose trade statistics are correct? Multiple mirror comparison techniques: a test case of Cambodia," Journal of Economic Policy Reform, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(1), pages 33-56, March.
    6. Jansen, Marion, 2004. "Income volatility in small and developing economies: export concentration matters," WTO Discussion Papers 3, World Trade Organization (WTO), Economic Research and Statistics Division.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    External trade; international value chains; clustering; industrial structure; European Union; Central–Eastern Europe; Hungary; Czech Republic; Slovakia; mechanical engineering; automotive industry;

    JEL classification:

    • F13 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade Policy; International Trade Organizations
    • F15 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Economic Integration
    • F23 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Multinational Firms; International Business
    • F43 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Economic Growth of Open Economies
    • H25 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Business Taxes and Subsidies
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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