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Residential Mobility, Migration and Economic Incentives - the Case of Hungary in 1990-1999

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  • Zsombor Cseres-Gergely

    () (Institute of Economics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences)

Abstract

Mobility in Hungary is a relatively infrequent phenomenon of which we have mostly aggregate-level information. I use settlement- and individual level data to show a more elaborate picture of the Hungarian population moving house across settlements and regions between 1990 and 1999. Along with giving an aggregate overview of mobility in the decade, characteristics of the mobile population is described. Using a simple economic model, I estimate the probabilities of moving house both from aggregate and individual data, and look at its response to economic incentives given by geographic differences in wages and unemployment. The findings show two main results. Firstly, the flow of people does follow wage and unemployment differences as expected, although exact parameter estimates vary in different models. Secondly, the findings show considerable heterogeneity on the individual level that prompts caution in extending results from simple local models to large distance or cross-border migration. Clear signs of the dominant change in mobility, a strong suburban development, is apparent that goes right against local labour market benefits.

Suggested Citation

  • Zsombor Cseres-Gergely, 2002. "Residential Mobility, Migration and Economic Incentives - the Case of Hungary in 1990-1999," Budapest Working Papers on the Labour Market 0207, Institute of Economics, Centre for Economic and Regional Studies, Hungarian Academy of Sciences.
  • Handle: RePEc:has:bworkp:0207
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    File URL: http://www.econ.core.hu/doc/bwp/bwp/bwp0207.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Bentolila, Samuel, 1997. "Sticky labor in Spanish regions," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 41(3-5), pages 591-598, April.
    2. George J. Borjas, 1994. "The Economics of Immigration," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 32(4), pages 1667-1717, December.
    3. Jackman, Richard & Savouri, Savvas, 1992. "Regional Migration in Britain: An Analysis of Gross Flows Using NHS Central Register Data," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 102(415), pages 1433-1450, November.
    4. Peter Mieszkowski & Edwin S. Mills, 1993. "The Causes of Metropolitan Suburbanization," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 7(3), pages 135-147, Summer.
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:iab:iabzaf:v:37:i:4:p:393-408 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Fazekas, Karoly, 2004. "Low participation and regional inequalities : interrelated features of the Hungarian labour market. Case study," Zeitschrift für ArbeitsmarktForschung - Journal for Labour Market Research, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany], vol. 37(4), pages 375-392.
    3. repec:iab:iabzaf:v:37:i:4:p:375-392 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Horn, Dániel & Gurzó, Klára, 2015. "A korai iskolai szelekció hosszú távú hatása. Egy közpolitikai kísérlet tanulságai
      [The long-term effects of early educational selection. A quasi-natural policy experiment from Hungary]
      ," Közgazdasági Szemle (Economic Review - monthly of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences), Közgazdasági Szemle Alapítvány (Economic Review Foundation), vol. 0(10), pages 1070-1096.
    5. Huber, Peter, 2004. "Inter-regional mobility in the accession countries : a comparison with EU15 member states," Zeitschrift für ArbeitsmarktForschung - Journal for Labour Market Research, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany], vol. 37(4), pages 393-408.

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