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A Note on Balanced-Budget Income Taxes and Aggregate (In)Stability in Multi-Sector Economies

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  • Nicolas Abad

    (CREAM - Centre de Recherche en Economie Appliquée à la Mondialisation - UNIROUEN - Université de Rouen Normandie - NU - Normandie Université - IRIHS - Institut de Recherche Interdisciplinaire Homme et Société - UNIROUEN - Université de Rouen Normandie - NU - Normandie Université)

  • Alain Venditti

    () (AMSE - Aix-Marseille Sciences Economiques - EHESS - École des hautes études en sciences sociales - AMU - Aix Marseille Université - ECM - Ecole Centrale de Marseille - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, EDHEC - EDHEC Business School)

Abstract

We examine the impact of balanced-budget labor income taxes on the existence of expectation- driven business cycles in a two-sector version of the Schmitt-Grohé and Uribe (SGU) [18] model with constant government expenditures and counter-cyclical taxes. Our results show that the destabilizing impact of labor income taxes strongly depends on the capital intensity difference across sectors. Local indeterminacy is indeed more likely when the consumption good sector is capital intensive, as the minimal tax rate decreases, and less likely when the investment good sector is capital intensive, as the minimal tax rate increases. The implication of this result can be quantitatively significant. Indeed, when compared to SGU, local indeterminacy can be either completely ruled out for all OECD countries when the investment good is sufficiently capital intensive, or drastically improved, delivering indeterminacy for a larger set of OECD countries, if the consumption good is sufficiently capital intensive. Focusing however on recent estimates of the sectoral capital shares corresponding to the empirically plausible case of a capital intensive consumption good, we find that there is a significant increase of the range of economically relevant labor tax rates (from a minimum tax rate of 30% to 24.7%) for which local indeterminacy arises with respect to the aggregate formulation of SGU.

Suggested Citation

  • Nicolas Abad & Alain Venditti, 2018. "A Note on Balanced-Budget Income Taxes and Aggregate (In)Stability in Multi-Sector Economies," Working Papers halshs-01934782, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:wpaper:halshs-01934782
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/halshs-01934782
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Matteo F. Ghilardi & Raffaele Rossi, 2014. "Aggregate Stability and Balanced‐Budget Rules," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 46(8), pages 1787-1809, December.
    2. Mendoza, Enrique G. & Razin, Assaf & Tesar, Linda L., 1994. "Effective tax rates in macroeconomics: Cross-country estimates of tax rates on factor incomes and consumption," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(3), pages 297-323, December.
    3. Abad, Nicolas & Seegmuller, Thomas & Venditti, Alain, 2017. "Nonseparable Preferences Do Not Rule Out Aggregate Instability Under Balanced-Budget Rules: A Note," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 21(1), pages 259-277, January.
    4. Dufourt, Frédéric & Nishimura, Kazuo & Venditti, Alain, 2015. "Indeterminacy and sunspots in two-sector RBC models with generalized no-income-effect preferences," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 157(C), pages 1056-1080.
    5. Anagnostopoulos, Alexis & Giannitsarou, Chryssi, 2013. "Indeterminacy And Period Length Under Balanced Budget Rules," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 17(4), pages 898-919, June.
    6. Baxter, Marianne, 1996. "Are Consumer Durables Important for Business Cycles?," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 78(1), pages 147-155, February.
    7. Takahashi, Harutaka & Mashiyama, Koichi & Sakagami, Tomoya, 2012. "Does The Capital Intensity Matter? Evidence From The Postwar Japanese Economy And Other Oecd Countries," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 16(S1), pages 103-116, April.
    8. Nourry, Carine & Seegmuller, Thomas & Venditti, Alain, 2013. "Aggregate instability under balanced-budget consumption taxes: A re-examination," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 148(5), pages 1977-2006.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    infinite-horizon two-sector model; capital intensity difference; aggregate (in)stability; local indeterminacy; expectations-driven fluctuations; labor income taxes; balanced-budget rule;

    JEL classification:

    • C62 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Existence and Stability Conditions of Equilibrium
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • O41 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - One, Two, and Multisector Growth Models

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