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Non-Separable Preferences do not Rule Out Aggregate Instability under Balanced-Budget Rules: A Note

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Abstract

We investigate the role of non-separable preferences on the occurrence of macroeconomic instability under a balanced-budget rule where government spending is financed by a tax on labor income. Considering a one-sector neoclassical growth model with a large class of non-separable utility functions, we find that expectations-driven fluctuations easily occur when consumption and labor are Edgeworth substitutes or weak Edgeworth complements. Under these properties, an intermediate range of tax rates and a sufficiently low elasticity of intertemporal substitution in consumption lead to instability.

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  • Nicolas Abad & Thomas Seegmuller & Alain Venditti, 2014. "Non-Separable Preferences do not Rule Out Aggregate Instability under Balanced-Budget Rules: A Note," AMSE Working Papers 1826, Aix-Marseille School of Economics, France.
  • Handle: RePEc:aim:wpaimx:1826
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    Cited by:

    1. Mauro Bambi & Alain Venditti, 2016. "Time-varying Consumption Tax, Productive Government Spending, and Aggregate Instability," Discussion Papers 16/01, Department of Economics, University of York.
    2. Maxime Menuet & Alexandru Minea & Patrick Villieu, 2019. "The Perils of Fiscal Rules," Working Papers hal-02291307, HAL.
    3. Nicolas Abad & Alain Venditti, 2018. "A Note on Balanced-Budget Income Taxes and Aggregate (In)Stability in Multi-Sector Economies," AMSE Working Papers 1828, Aix-Marseille School of Economics, France.
    4. Juin‐Jen Chang & Jang‐Ting Guo & Jhy‐Yuan Shieh & Wei‐Neng Wang, 2019. "Sectoral composition of government spending, distortionary income taxation, and macroeconomic (in)stability," International Journal of Economic Theory, The International Society for Economic Theory, vol. 15(1), pages 95-107, March.
    5. Jang-Ting Guo & Yan Zhang, 2017. "Macroeconomic Stability under Balanced-Budget Rules and No-Income-Effect Preferences," Working Papers 201704, University of California at Riverside, Department of Economics.
    6. Kevin X.D. Huang & Qinglai Meng & Jianpo Xue, 2018. "Balanced‐Budget Rules and Aggregate Instability: The Role of Endogenous Capital Utilization," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 50(8), pages 1669-1709, December.
    7. Maxime Menuet & Alexandru Minea & Patrick Villieu, 2019. "Budget Rules, Distortionnary Taxes, and Aggregate Instability: A reappraisal," Working Papers hal-02153856, HAL.
    8. Been-Lon Chen & Shun‐Fa Lee & Xavier Raurich, 2018. "Non‐separable Utilities and Aggregate Instability," IEAS Working Paper : academic research 18-A002, Institute of Economics, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan.

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