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Balanced Budget Rules and Aggregate Instability: The Role of Consumption Taxes

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  • Chryssi Giannitsarou

Abstract

It is known that, in the context of a real business cycle model with constant returns to scale and a balanced budget fiscal policy rule, steady state indeterminacy may arise as a result of endogenously determined labor income tax rates. This happens for a range of empirically plausible tax rates and this range is amplified if government expenditures are financed by a combination of capital and labor income taxes. This paper revisits the issue of indeterminacy and aggregate instability when government expenditures may be financed by consumption taxes as well. It is shown that by introducing consumption taxes, the ranges of indeterminacies shrink, thus reducing the possibility of aggregate instability. The results also add one more argument in favor of (the less distortionary) consumption taxes in place of capital taxes

Suggested Citation

  • Chryssi Giannitsarou, 2004. "Balanced Budget Rules and Aggregate Instability: The Role of Consumption Taxes," Econometric Society 2004 North American Summer Meetings 173, Econometric Society.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecm:nasm04:173
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Cooley, Thomas F. & Hansen, Gary D., 1992. "Tax distortions in a neoclassical monetary economy," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 58(2), pages 290-316, December.
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    11. Duffy, John & Xiao, Wei, 2007. "Instability of sunspot equilibria in real business cycle models under adaptive learning," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(3), pages 879-903, April.
    12. King, Robert G. & Plosser, Charles I. & Rebelo, Sergio T., 1988. "Production, growth and business cycles : I. The basic neoclassical model," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(2-3), pages 195-232.
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    Keywords

    Fiscal policy; consumption taxes; balanced budget rules; indeterminacy.;

    JEL classification:

    • C62 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Existence and Stability Conditions of Equilibrium
    • E62 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Fiscal Policy

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