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De la compréhension du biais de statu quo pour accompagner le changement : vers une mobilité des préférences

Author

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  • Anne Krupicka

    () (CEREGE - CEntre de REcherche en GEstion - EA 1722 - IAE Poitiers - Institut d'Administration des Entreprises (IAE) - Poitiers - Université de Poitiers - Université de Poitiers - ULR - Université de La Rochelle)

Abstract

Un des éléments de résistance au changement réside dans le biais de statu quo qui intervient dans la prise de décision. La théorie des perspectives développée par Kahneman et Tversky (1979) semble apporter un éclairage tant sur le poids de ce statu quo que sur les moyens d'y remédier. Après avoir décrit les facteurs explicatifs du statu quo, la présente communication explore les facteurs explicatifs du statu quo dans le basculement des préférences d'un produit A vers un produit B dans le secteur banque-assurance. Pour ce faire une observation participante, complétée par 14 entretiens individuels et deux tables rondes permettent d'identifier différents facteurs en interaction dans l'explication du statu quo observé. Mots-clés : Théorie des perspectives, biais de statu quo, approche ethnographique, facteurs explicatifs du statu quo Abstract : This paper introduces the prospect theory and presents the explanatory factors of the status quo bias. The methodology used on this research consists of a participating observation completed by 14 interviews and 2 focuses group. Through an example in the Bank Assurance sector, this paper identifies the determinants biais in interaction into the statu quo choice.

Suggested Citation

  • Anne Krupicka, 2018. "De la compréhension du biais de statu quo pour accompagner le changement : vers une mobilité des préférences," Post-Print hal-02152494, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:journl:hal-02152494
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-02152494
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    Keywords

    Prospect theory; statu quo bias; ethnography; explonatory factors of statu quo 1;
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