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Human Recognition and its Role in Economic Development: A Theoretical Model

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  • Tony Castleman

    () (Institute for International Economic Policy, George Washington University)

Abstract

This paper presents a model of human recognition, a concept defined as the acknowledgement provided to an individual that he is of inherent value with intrinsic qualities in common with the recognizer. The model describes provision and receipt of human recognition, its contribution to utility, its effects on health and labor supply, and the role it plays in development programs. The model provides a theoretical basis for understanding human recognition, lays the foundation for empirical study, and offers an example of how non-material components of development can be formally modeled. Key predictions from the model are that human recognition has a positive, causal relationship with utility, health outcomes, and labor supply; that multiple equilibria forhuman recognition can exist, and groups can be stuck in low-level equilibria; and that only accounting for the instrumental effects recognition has on material outcomes while ignoring its direct effects on utility leads to suboptimal programs.

Suggested Citation

  • Tony Castleman, 2011. "Human Recognition and its Role in Economic Development: A Theoretical Model," Working Papers 2011-9, The George Washington University, Institute for International Economic Policy.
  • Handle: RePEc:gwi:wpaper:2011-9
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    File URL: http://www.gwu.edu/~iiep/assets/docs/papers/Castleman_IIEPWP2011-09.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Tony Castleman, 2011. "Human Recognition among HIV-Infected Adults: Empirical Evidence from a Randomized Controlled Trial in Kenya," Working Papers 2011-11, The George Washington University, Institute for International Economic Policy.
    2. Alkire, Sabina & Foster, James, 2011. "Counting and multidimensional poverty measurement," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 95(7-8), pages 476-487, August.
    3. Tony Castleman, 2011. "Human Recognition and its Role in Economic Development: A Descriptive Review," Working Papers 2011-08, The George Washington University, Institute for International Economic Policy.
    4. Marcel Fafchamps & Agnes R. Quisumbing, 1999. "Human Capital, Productivity, and Labor Allocation in Rural Pakistan," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 34(2), pages 369-406.
    5. Tony Castleman, 2011. "Measurement of Human Recognition: A Methodology with Empirical Applications in India and Kenya," Working Papers 2011-10, The George Washington University, Institute for International Economic Policy.
    6. Francis Bloch & Vijayendra Rao, 2002. "Terror as a Bargaining Instrument: A Case Study of Dowry Violence in Rural India," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(4), pages 1029-1043, September.
    7. Pierre Cahuc & André Zylberberg, 2004. "Labor Economics," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 026203316x, January.
    8. Cameron, Lisa A & Dowling, J Malcolm & Worswick, Christopher, 2001. "Education and Labor Market Participation of Women in Asia: Evidence from Five Countries," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 49(3), pages 461-477, April.
    9. Fafchamps, Marcel & Quisumbing, Agnes R., 1999. "Social roles, human capital, and the intrahousehold division of labor," FCND discussion papers 73, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    human recognition; economic development; health; poverty; well-being; dignity; respect; dehumanization; humiliation;

    JEL classification:

    • I31 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General Welfare, Well-Being
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • I14 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health and Inequality

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