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Human Recognition among HIV-Infected Adults: Empirical Evidence from a Randomized Controlled Trial in Kenya

Author

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  • Tony Castleman

    () (Institute for International Economic Policy, George Washington University)

Abstract

This paper uses data from a randomized controlled trial to study the impacts of food supplementation and medical treatment on the receipt of human recognition by malnourished, HIV-infected adults in Kenya. Questions specially designed to measure human recognition were included in the trial, demonstrating how data on human recognition can be collected and analyzed as part of research or programs. The data are used to examine the impacts of interventions on human recognition, the determinants of human recognition receipt, and the role that human recognition plays in nutritional status and subjective well-being. Food supplementation has a significant, independent, positive impact on recognition received at completion of 6 months of food supplementation, but this effect does not persist 6 months after completion of the supplementation. The location of the study sites appears to play a significant role in the changes in human recognition, with smaller improvements among subjects at clinics in urban slums of Nairobi than among subjects in district and provincial hospitals outside of Nairobi, controlling for demographic, socio-economic, and health characteristics. Women receive lower levels of human recognition than men and also have worse mental health; further study is needed to better understand the relationship among gender, mental health, and human recognition. There is some evidence of an association between nutritional status and human recognition, but findings about the role human recognition plays in nutritional status and subjective well-being are mixed and further study is needed in this area, possibly over a longer timeframe than 12 months.

Suggested Citation

  • Tony Castleman, 2011. "Human Recognition among HIV-Infected Adults: Empirical Evidence from a Randomized Controlled Trial in Kenya," Working Papers 2011-11, The George Washington University, Institute for International Economic Policy.
  • Handle: RePEc:gwi:wpaper:2011-11
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    File URL: http://www.gwu.edu/~iiep/assets/docs/papers/Castleman_IIEPWP2011-11.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Kingdon, Geeta Gandhi & Knight, John, 2007. "Community, comparisons and subjective well-being in a divided society," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 64(1), pages 69-90, September.
    2. Christopher F Baum, 2006. "An Introduction to Modern Econometrics using Stata," Stata Press books, StataCorp LP, number imeus.
    3. Tony Castleman, 2011. "Human Recognition and its Role in Economic Development: A Descriptive Review," Working Papers 2011-08, The George Washington University, Institute for International Economic Policy.
    4. M. Shahe Emran & Forhad Shilpi, 2012. "The extent of the market and stages of agricultural specialization," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, pages 1125-1153.
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    Cited by:

    1. Tony Castleman, 2011. "Human Recognition and its Role in Economic Development: A Theoretical Model," Working Papers 2011-9, The George Washington University, Institute for International Economic Policy.
    2. Tony Castleman, 2011. "Human Recognition and its Role in Economic Development: A Descriptive Review," Working Papers 2011-08, The George Washington University, Institute for International Economic Policy.
    3. M. Shahe Emran & Forhad Shilpi, 2012. "The extent of the market and stages of agricultural specialization," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, pages 1125-1153.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    human recognition; respect; dehumanization; HIV; AIDS; malnutrition; nutrition; food supplementation; well being; randomized trial; stigma; Kenya;

    JEL classification:

    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • I31 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General Welfare, Well-Being
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • I14 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health and Inequality

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