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Heaven Game

Author

Listed:
  • Aurora García-Gallego

    () (LEE-Ec. Dpt., U. Jaume I (Spain))

  • Nikolaos Georgantzís

    () (Agriculture Policy and Development, University of Reading (UK) &LEE & Economics Dept., Universitat Jaume I, Castellón (Spain))

  • Ainhoa Jaramillo-Gutiérrez

    () (Department of Economic Theory and Economic History, University of Granada.)

Abstract

We present an experiment on the Heaven game, a generalization of the dictator game. The heavendictator player chooses between increasing, decreasing and maintaining the earnings of the passive player, without incurring any cost or profit. Thus, we avoid the experimenter demand effect. Based on the psychological literature on music as mood inductor and on the effects of mood on helping behavior, we also study the effect of exposure to different types of music on the heaven-dictator choices. We find that the overwhelming majority of subjects choose to increase their partners’ earnings and no general effect of music over the heaven-dictator choices, except for classical music that seems to foster helping-indifference behavior.

Suggested Citation

  • Aurora García-Gallego & Nikolaos Georgantzís & Ainhoa Jaramillo-Gutiérrez, 2015. "Heaven Game," ThE Papers 15/07, Department of Economic Theory and Economic History of the University of Granada..
  • Handle: RePEc:gra:wpaper:15/07
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    File URL: http://www.ugr.es/~teoriahe/RePEc/gra/wpaper/thepapers15_07.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    4. Bolton, Gary E, 1991. "A Comparative Model of Bargaining: Theory and Evidence," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 81(5), pages 1096-1136, December.
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    6. Cox, James C. & Friedman, Daniel & Gjerstad, Steven, 2007. "A tractable model of reciprocity and fairness," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 59(1), pages 17-45, April.
    7. Blanco, Mariana & Engelmann, Dirk & Normann, Hans Theo, 2011. "A within-subject analysis of other-regarding preferences," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 72(2), pages 321-338, June.
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    9. Zizzo, Daniel John, 2003. "Money burning and rank egalitarianism with random dictators," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 81(2), pages 263-266, November.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    experimental economics; behavioural economics; other-regarding preferences; musicinduced mood; dictator game;

    JEL classification:

    • C72 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Noncooperative Games
    • C91 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Laboratory, Individual Behavior

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