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The pleasure of being nasty

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  • Abbink, Klaus
  • Sadrieh, Abdolkarim

Abstract

We introduce the joy-of-destruction game. Two players each receive an endowment and simultaneously decide on how much of the other player's endowment to destroy. In a treatment without fear of retaliation, money is destroyed in almost 40% of all decisions.

Suggested Citation

  • Abbink, Klaus & Sadrieh, Abdolkarim, 2009. "The pleasure of being nasty," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 105(3), pages 306-308, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:105:y:2009:i:3:p:306-308
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Spite Nastiness Money-burning Anti-social behavior;

    JEL classification:

    • C72 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Noncooperative Games
    • C90 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - General
    • D82 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Asymmetric and Private Information; Mechanism Design

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