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Time discounting (d) and pain anticipation: Experimental evidence

Author

Listed:
  • Pablo Brañas-Garza

    () (GLOBE and Universidad de Granada)

  • María Paz Espinosa

    () (Universidad del País Vasco)

  • María Repolles

    (GLOBE and Universidad de Granada and Virgen de las Nieves Hospital, Granada)

Abstract

This paper deals with pain anticipation experienced before medical procedures. Our experimental results show that individuals with lower discount factors are more prone to suffer pain in advance. We provide a framework to rationalize the connection between pain anticipation and impatience. In this set up, more impatient subjects, who only value very near events, take into account mainly the negative effects of medical procedures (just the costs) whereas more patient individuals have a net positive valuation of medical events (given that they value both the cost incurred now and all the benefits accrued in the future).

Suggested Citation

  • Pablo Brañas-Garza & María Paz Espinosa & María Repolles, 2010. "Time discounting (d) and pain anticipation: Experimental evidence," ThE Papers 10/13, Department of Economic Theory and Economic History of the University of Granada..
  • Handle: RePEc:gra:wpaper:10/13
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    File URL: http://www.ugr.es/~teoriahe/RePEc/gra/wpaper/thepapers10_13.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. David M. Cutler & Edward Glaeser, 2005. "What Explains Differences in Smoking, Drinking, and Other Health-Related Behaviors?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(2), pages 238-242, May.
    2. Knutson, Brian & Peterson, Richard, 2005. "Neurally reconstructing expected utility," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 52(2), pages 305-315, August.
    3. W. Viscusi & Joel Huber & Jason Bell, 2008. "Estimating discount rates for environmental quality from utility-based choice experiments," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 37(2), pages 199-220, December.
    4. David Laibson, 1997. "Golden Eggs and Hyperbolic Discounting," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 112(2), pages 443-478.
    5. Glaeser, Edward & Cutler, David, 2005. "What Explains Differences in Smoking, Drinking, and Other Health Related Behaviors," Scholarly Articles 2664274, Harvard University Department of Economics.
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